Home of the Rangers Mural

Sexual Misconduct Policy & Sexual Violence Resources

1is2many

1 victim is 2 many

ALL Students Are Required to Complete Online Sexual Violence Prevention Training

Northwestern Oklahoma State University takes acts of sexual violence and sexual harassment seriously. In an effort to comply with the Violence Against Women Act and the Office for Civil Rights federal guidelines, all students are required to complete online training on sexual violence prevention.  Training should take around 40 minutes.

To complete the training follow these steps:

Haven Login Instructions:
-Login to Rangernet
-Select the student tab
-On the left hand side (under the Student Dashboard box) click on "Everfi - Haven Course Student (CCv3)"
-Click on LAUCH HAVEN COURSE
-Input demographic information
-Complete the program


A Sexual Assault, Alcohol & Drug Awareness Seminar was held for our students in September 2017:

Sexual Misconduct Policy

 

 

 

 

 

Sexual Assault Anonymous Reporting Form

Using the form Sexual Assault Anonymous Reporting Form, student victims/survivors of sexual assault may file an anonymous report with the Office of Student Conduct, whether or not the victim of a sexual assault decides to file disciplinary and/or legal charges against the offender at a later date.

There is not a statute of limitations on filing complaints within the Office of Student Conduct. If you later decide to file disciplanary and/or legal charges, you may initiate this process by contacting the Office of Student Conduct, Kaylyn Hansen, at (580) 327-8418; NWOSU Campus Police at (580) 327-8511; or the Title IX Coordinator, Calleb Mosburg, at (580) 327-8415.

To keep information anonymous, do NOT include names of victim or perpetrators. If names are included, this is no longer considered an anonymous report and an investigation may be conducted by NWOSU Campus Police and the Office of Student Conduct, respectively.

Student Training

Join Northwestern in its stance that 1 is 2 many and its effort to maintain a safe environment where all members of the campus community can live, learn and be successful.

Northwestern is committed to addressing sexual misconduct and does not condone any form of sexual misconduct whether physical, mental, verbal, or emotional in nature.  NWOSU believes that 1 victim is 2 many.  Northwestern Oklahoma State University takes acts of sexual violence and sexual harassment seriously. In an effort to comply with the Violence Against Women Act and the Office for Civil Rights federal guidelines, all students are required to complete online training on sexual violence prevention.

To complete the training follow these steps:

  • Click this link:  UPDATE LINK
  • Log-in with your Okey account information. 

Important Information

  • You will need Internet access and audio capabilities.
  • You may take the course in multiple sittings. Sections end with a “Next” button. DO NOT log out until you click the “Next” button or you will have to repeat the section.
  • The course may include surveys to help personalize your experience and measure students’ attitudes and behaviors. All survey responses are confidential; the school will only receive information about the student body as a whole and will never see individual student responses.
  • After you complete the Final Exam, there is 45 day waiting period before you will be able to access the Follow-up Survey (Part 2).
  • Resources are available in the top menu bar throughout the course through the "Materials" tab.  We encourage you to check out these resources and utilize them if needed.
  • Should you experience technical difficulties, click the “Help” button to access the 24/7 help center.

1 is 2 Many Training Frequently Asked Questions

What exactly must I complete?
Students must complete all of Part 1 Training including the following:

  • Intro Text & Pre-Survey: Questions regarding personal beliefs, knowledge, and ideas answered on a scale and then questions regarding personal history/demographics answered in multiple choice format. (These questions can be skipped, only these questions can be skipped.)
  • Pre-Quiz: Questions regarding knowledge of subject answered in multiple choice format.
  • 7 Interactive Modules: These include videos, interactive portions, quizzes, and reading about various topics within sexual violence.
  • Introduction
  • Connections
  • Be Yourself
  • Join the Conversation
  • Creating Community
  • Explore Your Options
  • Next Steps
  • Post-Quiz: The same questions regarding knowledge as pre-quiz. 

I am not sure I completed my training. What do I do?
If you are unsure of your completion, you can always log back into the training system. 

The website is not working on my computer. What do I do?
Please refer to the troubleshooting guide or call this 24/7 help desk phone number, 1-866-384-9062. In addition, there is a Help button within the Haven system that can assist with technical difficulties 24/7.

Information from Oklahoma State University website, http://1is2many.okstate.edu

I've Been Assaulted. What Do I Do?

You are not alone. Many people survive rape or sexual assault and cope with these experiences. You are in no way responsible for your sexual assault. A sexual assault can happen to anyone regardless of how they look or act. Speak with a counselor. Sexual assault is a traumatic experience that can cause many emotional repercussions. No one should have to deal with that alone - what happened is NOT your fault.

Safety

First and foremost, think about your personal safety. Are you safe from your attacker? Do you need immediate help?

  • If you do not feel you are safe, call NWOSU Campus Police or Alva Police Department and they will immediately assist you.
    • NWOSU Campus Police:  (580) 327-8511 for on-campus incidents
    • Alva Police Department:   (580) 327-2064 for off-campus incidents
  • NWOSU has a designated sexual assault advocate (580-327-6648) to assist you and help meet your immediate needs. The NWOSU sexual assault advocate will give you advice, information, talk with you about your options, and facilitate decision making.

Once you have secured your safety, think about getting medical attention.

Medical Attention

Immediate medical attention may be necessary to prevent the spread of sexually transmitted infection and possible pregnancy, as well as treat any wounds incurred.

Go to Alva Share Medical Center to receive care for any physical injuries that may have occurred.  While in the emergency room, treatment will be provided for sexually transmitted diseases and to prevent pregnancy.

Go to Woodward Regional Hospital to see a Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (SANE) for a rape examination kit.  You will be examined by the nurse in order to treat any injuries to gather evidence.  Travel to Woodward Regional Hospital can be provided by NWOSU Victim's Advocate Karen Thomas (Northwest Domestic Crisis Services) by calling 580-327-6648 or 1-888-256-1215.

What To Do

  • Do not shower, bathe, douche, change or destroy clothes; do not eat, drink, smoke or chew gum; do not take any medications; do not remove sheets from bed; do not straighten room or place of the incident.  Preserving evidence is critical for criminal prosecution. If you do take evidence (i.e., sheets), you need to take it in a brown paper bag (not plastic). Plastic may contaminate evidence. Although an individual may not want to prosecute immediately after the incident, that choice may not be available later without credible evidence. The evidence collected can also be useful in the campus disciplinary process.
  • Receiving a SANE exam does not commit you to a full prosecution, rather will preserve any potential evidence if you decide you would like to prosecute at a later date.
  • With your permission, the sexual assault Victim Advocate will support you throughout the entire exam, which will be performed by the nurse.  The advocate will provide a packet of written materials that contains information about common reactions to sexual assault, follow-up medical needs and support services.

Support Services

Even if you choose not to access medical attention, you are encouraged to seek support services when you are ready.  These might include counseling, law enforcement, or student conduct services. You can read more about resources on the Campus Resources page or Interim Safety Measures listed below.

Interim Safety Measures

The Title IX Coordinator can put in place interim measures for student victims of sexual harassment and sexual violence as needed.  A formal complaint does not need to be submitted to have interim measures put in place.  The university will maintain confidentiality to the extent possible.

a.    Assistance in Reporting:  The Title IX Coordinator can assist in filing a complaint through the Title IX process and the appropriate law enforcement agencies against the student(s) who caused harm.

b.    No Contact Order:  The Title IX Coordinator can put in place a No Contact Order between the complainant and the respondent, which would prohibit contact between parties through any means of communication, as well as prohibit others from making contact on their behalf.

c.    Emergency Protective Order:  NWOSU’s Victim Advocate, Karmen Thomas can assist victims in filing for an Emergency Protective Order.  This is a court-ordered petition that prohibits contact between the complainant and respondent.

d.    Safety Measures:  The Title IX Coordinator can coordinate any reasonable arrangements that are necessary for ongoing safety.  This includes transportation arrangements or providing an escort.

e.    Living Arrangements: The Title IX Coordinator can assist in changing on-campus living arrangements or that of the respondent to ensure safety and a comfortable living situation.

f.     Academic Arrangements:  The Title IX Coordinator can assist in adjusting academic schedules as well as assist in providing access to academic support services.

g.    Other Interim Measures:  The Title IX Coordinator can coordinate reasonable arrangements to address the effects of the sexual violence, including connecting victims with counseling, health care or academic support resources.

When Title IX becomes aware of a student who potentially could have been a victim of sexual violence, they will contact the victim through Northwestern Oklahoma State University email or mail to share these potential interim measures, reporting options and other resources available.  This will be done no matter the location of the incident.

Student Conduct Process

ONCE YOU HAVE FILED A COMPLAINT WITH THE TITLE IX COORDINATOR

We want you to be knowledgeable about the process that occurs once a complaint with the Title IX Coordinator is filed.  The following describes the investigation process, the hearing and the outcome of the hearing.  The Title IX Coordinator will be available to explain the process as requested.  The Title IX investigation process will be prompt, fair, and impartial.  This means the process will be completed within a reasonable timeframe as designated below and without undue delay.  The process will be conducted in a manner that is consistent with the university’s policies and will be transparent to all parties.  Lastly, the Title IX process will be conducted by officials who do not have conflict of interest or bias for the complainant or respondent. 

INVESTIGATION

  • You will be notified of receipt of your complaint and the actions the university official will take.
  • A university official will meet with you to discuss the complaint submitted, review the investigation and hearing process, and determine the outcome you desire from your complaint.
  • An investigation will be conducted by a non-biased Title IX Investigator.  This investigation will include:
  • reviewing any documentary evidence.
  • The investigation of complaints will be adequate, reliable, and impartial.  The Title IX Investigator will compile an investigation report.
  • The investigation process can take up to 60 days.  If at any point either party would like an update of the investigation process all they need to do is ask and an update will be provided.
  • The university official will determine if a Title IX conduct hearing is possible based on the available information.
  • If it is determined that the university will proceed with a formal Title IX conduct hearing, the complainant and the responding student(s) will be notified of the hearing date.

HEARING

  • Hearing notification will occur at least five administrative office days in advance and include the hearing date, time and location.  Hearings will be scheduled around academic schedules.
  • Allegations of sexual misconduct and sexual harassment will be heard by the Sexual Assault Response Team’s hearing committee.
  • The hearing includes opening statements, presentation of the investigation report, information about the incident, presentation of information by witnesses, and closing statements.
  • Each party is permitted to have a person of their choosing to accompany them throughout the hearing as an advisor.
  • All parties are permitted to be present during the hearing (except during deliberations of the panel).  All parties can be in the same room in a pre-arranged, non-threatening set-up or in separate rooms with a video conference set up.
  • All parties are permitted to make statements, present witnesses and information during the hearing.  Witnesses and information need to be directly related to the incident.
  • The Sexual Assault Response Team’s hearing committee will make a determination of the policy violations and, if any, the appropriate sanction(s).
  • The standard of proof used in all university hearings is preponderance of the evidence, which means the determination to be made is whether it is more likely than not a violation occurred.  This is significantly different than proof beyond reasonable doubt, which is required for a criminal prosecution.

OUTCOME

  • Possible outcomes include the entire range of sanctions listed in the Sexual Misconduct Policy.  When it is determined that sexual misconduct is more likely than not to have occurred, the outcome can include separation from the university.
  • Both parties have the right to be informed, in writing, of the outcome.  You will be notified within seven business days after the hearing, at the same time the respondent is informed of the outcome.
  • Both parties have the right to appeal the decision reached through the hearing proceedings within five administrative office days after notification of the hearing outcome.  

Supporting Sexual Violence Victims

How to Support a Friend

Often, victims report that one of the worst parts about experiencing sexual assault is losing control of their choices and what happens to them. So, it is your responsibility to give the victim back as much control as possible.  This means allowing the victim to make his/her own decisions about the next steps they will take regarding medical attention, law enforcement, counseling, and who hears their story.

If your friend is a victim of sexual violence the following information can offer guidance on how to help and support.

  1. Listen and accept what you hear. Do not press for details. Allow your friend to reflect on what has happened and to share some of her/his feelings. This is important because asking victims about details of a situation, like what they were wearing, where they were, or who they were with, might come across as blaming victims because of these things.
     
  2. Keep what is said confidential. The victim should always decide who hears their story and who does not; even if you have good intentions in telling someone without the victim's permission, your actions may further harm the victim. This does not apply to University employees as employees are required to report all Title IX issues to the office of Student Conduct or the Title IX office.
     
  3. Let your friend know that she/he is not to blame. Many victims tend to blame themselves for the offenders actions, especially if the perpetrator was an acquaintance.
     
  4. Encourage your friend to obtain a medical examination. 
       
  5. Encourage your friend to call the NWOSU Victim's Advocate (580-327-6648).
       
  6. Seek emotional support for yourself if needed. Again, it is incredibly difficult to watch a friend go through this. Not only could a counselor help you process this experience, the counselor may be able to give you advice on how to continue helping your friend.
     
  7. Allow your friend to make their own decision about their next steps.
     
  8. Accept their choice even if you disagree with what they have chosen to do. It is important that they feel empowered to make choices and take back control. Do not impose your values on the victim.
     
  9. Encourage your friend to file a police report. Filing a report does not commit you to prosecute, but will allow the gathering of information and evidence. The information and evidence maintain future options regarding criminal prosecution, university disciplinary actions and/or civil actions against the perpetrator. Information can be helpful in supporting other reports and/or preventing further incidents (even anonymous reports are useful).
     
  10. Offer campus resources to your friend.

Supporting Domestic Violence Victims

As with sexual violence, supporting a friend who is a victim of domestic/dating violence is no easy task.  It is very different from helping a friend with an everyday problem.  Thus, it will be important to get appropriate information from professionals and obtain services for yourself as well. Below are some helpful guidelines to consult.

When a friend confides in you that means he/she trusts that you can help and that they are seriously concerned about their relationship.  Many times in Domestic Violence relationships, the victim does not disclose to anyone due to the psychological control often experienced; so, know that a disclosure is big deal and your response matters.

When a Friend Tells Me about Their Relationship…

The best thing you can do when a friend initially discloses their concerns about their relationship is simply listen with a non-judgmental ear and offer support.  Often, you might feel angry towards to the offending partner and want to tell your friend all the bad things you think about him/her.  However, this is counterproductive. The last thing your friend needs is another angry person to calm down. It is important that you stay very even-tempered so that your friend knows you are a safe resource.  Also, it is very common for victims of Domestic Violence to continue the relationship with the abuser for a length of time even after disclosing their concerns. Your friend will be much less likely to confide in you again should things get worse if you react overly negatively towards the abusive partner.  Thus, while you want to express your concern for your friend, you don’t want to be so expressive that your friend doesn’t feel comfortable talking to you about it again.  

Here are some guidelines for reacting to a friend when he/she tells you about their abusive relationship:

  • Ensure that you are both safe, i.e. talk in a confidential location away from the abusive partner.
  • Stay calm; do not become overly angry at the abusive partner.
  • Listen with a non-judgmental ear.
  • Tell your friend that he/she deserves to be treated with respect and make sure he/she understands this behavior is not his/her fault.
  • Be clear when stating that you are concerned the partner's behavior will continue to get worse, because you know that DV typically escalates over time, and that you think your friend is in danger.
  • Offer resources your friend can utilize.
  • Offer to assist your friend in any action he/she could potentially take, i.e. go with him/her to the Title IX Office to file a University complaint, go with him/her to the police station to file a police report, go with him/her to talk to a counselor, etc.

Again, it is very common for victims to remain with the abusive partner even after disclosing to a friend. While it may seem very clear to you that the best decision is to leave the abusive partner, Domestic Violence is a very complex and confusing experience for victims.  There is no easy answer for why victims to stay with their abusive partners as there are many psychological factors at play. Many times, victims feel they cannot support themselves, they still love their partner and hope that he/she will change, or they blame themselves for the abuse.  You can learn more about some of the reasons a victim might stay and other information at safehorizon.org.

When the Friend Chooses Not to Leave...

If you are in a situation where a friend is choosing to stay with the abusive partner against your recommendation or concerns, it can be incredibly frustrating.  You might even become angry with your friend for not taking care of themselves or making what you percieve to be dangerous decisions.  While that is a very understandable reaction, your response at this point is critical.  The best thing you can do is accept your friend’s choices, even if you don’t agree with them.  That way, your friend continues to know that you are a safe resource.  Sometimes, you might even think that giving your friend an ultimatum (e.g. leave your partner or I can’t be friends with you) might convince them to leave.  However, this only serves to further restrict resources available to your friend and makes them even more vulnerable. 

Here are some tips for continuing to help a friend who stay with their abusive partner:

  • Accept your friend’s choices, even if you don’t agree with them.
  • Continue to gently express your concern for your friend and ensure that your friend knows the abuse is not his/her fault.
  • Continue to provide resources and offer to assist with anything you can.
  • Talk to a counselor yourself to ensure that you are taking care of yourself.

This is not an easy situation by any means. You will likely become very frustrated and may even feel helpless. However, you are not helpless and you can continue to be there for your friend so that when/if your friend decides they are ready to leave, your friend has a safe place to turn.

What if I Suspect a Friend's Relationship is Abusive?

If you suspect that your friend's relationship may be abusive, you have a couple of options: do nothing or intervene in some way.  If you are truly concerned about a friend, the best thing you can do is express that concern as early as possible before the relationship gets worse.  While you do not want to be so forceful that your friend becomes angry with you, there are ways you can gently express concern. Here are some you could choose from: 

  • Always consider safety first, i.e. ensure that you and the friend are in a safe location away from the partner before talking.
  • Talk to a professional counselor to get advice about how to approach your friend .
  • Provide your friend with education regarding what Domestic Violence looks like.
  • Calmly explain what behaviors exhibited by the partner lead you to be concerned.
  • Be sure your friend knows that the concerning behavior is not his/her fault.

Again, this is not an easy situation for anyone. The best thing you can do is consult professionals both for yourself and for your friend.

Information from Oklahoma State University website, http://1is2many.okstate.edu

Definitions

Definitions As Described in Oklahoma State Statutes

SEXUAL HARASSMENT

Sexual harassment is unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, & other verbal or physical conduct or communication of a sexual nature when:

a)    Submission to such conduct or communication is made either explicitly or implicitly as a term or condition of educational benefits, employment, academic evaluations or other academic opportunities,
b)    Submission to or rejection of such conduct by an individual is used as the basis for an employment decision or academic decision affecting such individual, or
c)    Such conduct is sufficiently severe, pervasive or persistent and objectively offensive that it has the effect of creating an intimidating, hostile or offensive environment that negatively affects an individual’s academic or employment environment.


Sexual harassment does not include verbal expressions or written materials that are relevant and appropriately related to course subject matter or curriculum, and this policy shall not abridge academic freedom or the university’s educational mission.

Sexual harassment can create a hostile environment.  Sexual harassment should be reported even if it doesn’t reach the point of creating a hostile environment.  A hostile environment is defined as subjectively and objectively offensive and sufficiently severe or pervasive to alter the conditions of the victim’s educational, employment or university environment.

Sexual harassment could occur off-campus and still have an effect on an individual’s educational, employment or university environment as well as create a hostile environment.  A one-time non-consensual contact could also create a hostile environment.

Examples of behavior that could be sexual harassment:
·         Unwelcome sexual flirtation, advances, or propositions of sexual activity.
·         Asking about someone else’s personal, social or sexual life or about their sexual fantasies, preferences or history.

  • Discussing your own personal sexual fantasies, preferences or history.
  • Repeatedly asking for a date from a person who is not interested.
  • Whistles, cat calls or insulting sounds.
  • Sexually suggestive jokes, innuendoes or turning discussions into sexual topics.
  • Sexually offensive or degrading language used to describe an individual or remarks of a sexual nature to describe a person’s body or clothing.
  • Calling a person a “hunk,” “doll,” “babe,” “sugar,” “honey,” or similar descriptive terms.
  • Displaying sexually demeaning or offensive objects and pictures.
  • Making sexual gestures with hands or body movement.
  • Rating a person’s sexuality.
  • Unwelcomed touching of a person’s body including massaging a person.

SEXUAL VIOLENCE

Sexual violence is physical sexual acts perpetrated against a person’s will or where a person is incapable of giving consent.  A number of different acts fall into a category of sexual violence, including sexual misconduct, stalking, dating violence, and domestic violence.

SEXUAL MISCONDUCT

Sexual misconduct is a broad term encompassing any non-consensual contact of a sexual nature.  Sexual misconduct may vary in severity and consists of a range of behavior or attempted behavior including, but not limited to, the following examples of prohibited conduct:

a)    Unwelcome sexual touching/exposure
The touch of an unwilling or non-consensual person’s intimate parts (such as genitalia, groin, breast, buttocks, mouth or clothing covering same); touching an unwilling person with one’s own intimate parts; or forcing an unwilling person to touch another’s intimate parts.  This also includes indecent exposure and voyeurism.
b)    Non-consensual sexual assault
Unwilling or non-consensual penetration of any bodily opening with an object or body part.  This includes, but is not limited to, penetration of a bodily opening without effective consent through the use of coercion.
c)    Forced sexual assault
Unwilling or non-consensual penetration of any bodily opening with any object or body part that is committed either by force, threat, intimidation, or through exploitation of another’s mental or physical condition (such as lack of consciousness, incapacitation due to drugs or alcohol, age, or disability) of which the assailant was aware or should have been aware.

Effective Consent is:

  • informed;
  • freely and actively given;
  • mutually understandable words or actions; and
  • willingness to participate in mutually agreed upon sexual activity.

Further:

  • Initiators of sexual activity are responsible for obtaining effective consent.
  • Silence or passivity is not effective consent.
  • The use of intimidation, coercion, threats, force or violence negates any consent obtained.
  • Consent is not considered effective if obtained from an individual who is incapable of giving consent due to the following:
    • mental, developmental, or physical disability; or
    • s/he is under the legal age to give consent; or
    • s/he is incapacitated by alcohol, beer or  under the influence of drugs.

Individuals who commit acts of sexual misconduct assume responsibility for their behavior and must understand that the use of alcohol or other drugs does not reduce accountability for their actions.

Examples of sexual misconduct violations:

  • Ignoring an individual’s protest and engaging in sexual activity.
  • Convincing somebody to have sex likely constitutes intimidation or coercion.  If someone is coerced, the yes is not effective consent.
  • Drinking and/or drug use may render an individual incapable of giving consent for sexual activity.  For example, someone who is incapacitated may agree to have sex at the time, but have no memory of the consent.  This person may have been functioning in a “blackout” and could not give effective consent.
  • Holding a person down or preventing a person from leaving the room and forcing him or her to engage in sexual activity against his/her will.

STALKING

Stalking is to engage in a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to fear for his or her safety or the safety of others; or suffer substantial emotional distress.

Stalking is defined to mean two or more acts, including, but not limited to, acts in which the stalker directly, indirectly, or through third parties, by any action, method, device, or means, follows, monitors, observes, surveys, threatens, or communicates to or about a person, or interferes with a person’s property.

Substantial emotional distress would include significant mental suffering or anguish that may, but does not necessarily, require medical or other professional treatment or counseling.

Stalking is the willful, malicious, and repeated following or harassment of a person in a manner that would cause a reasonable person to feel frightened, intimidated, threatened, harassed or molested and actually causes the person being followed or harassed to feel terrorized, frightened, intimidated, threatened, harassed or molested.  Stalking also means a course of conduct composed of a series of two or more separate acts over a period of time, demonstrating a continuity of purpose or unwelcomed contact with a person that is initiated or continued without the consent of the individual or in disregard of the expressed desire of the individual that the contact be avoided or discontinued.  This may include repeatedly contacting another person (through any means, such as in person, by phone, electronic means, text messaging, etc.), following another person, or having others contact another person.

Any actions that a stalker takes to contact, harass, track or frighten another that could include repeatedly:

  • following
  • unsolicited visits or communication
  • using online social media inappropriately
  • damaging property
  • showing up at places an intended victim(s) frequents
  • sending pictures
  • creating a website about a target of stalking
  • sending unsolicited gifts
  • stealing things that belong to intended victims
  • calling repeatedly

Stalking can occur by someone that is known casually, a current boyfriend or girlfriend, someone dated in the past or a stranger. 

Definition consistent with Violence Against Women Act Volume 79 CFR and Oklahoma state statute.

DATING VIOLENCE

Dating Violence is committed by a person who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with another person.  The existence of such relationship shall be determined based on a consideration of the following factors:

  • Length of the relationship
  • Type of relationship
  • Frequency of interaction between the persons involved in the relationship.

Dating violence includes, but is not limited to, sexual or physical abuse or the threat of such abuse.

Dating violence does not include acts that meet the definition of domestic violence.

Definition consistent with Violence Against Women Act Volume 79 CFR.

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE

Domestic violence is a crime of violence committed by a:

  • current or former spouse or intimate partner of the victim,
  • person with whom the victim shares a child in common,
  • person who is cohabitating with or has cohabited with the victim as a spouse,
  • person similarly situation to a spouse of the victim.

Domestic violence is a pattern of abusive behavior in any relationship that is used by one partner to gain or maintain power and control over another intimate partner.  Domestic violence can be physical, sexual, emotional, economic or psychological actions or threat of actions that influence another person.

Definition consistent with Violence Against Women Act Volume 79 CFR.

RETALIATION

The University will not tolerate retaliation against a person who, in good faith, brings a complaint forward.  Retaliation against an individual who has brought a complaint forward or against an individual who has participated in an investigation or conduct process in prohibited.

Retaliation is any attempt to:

  • penalize, or
  • take an adverse employment, educational, or institutional benefit action, including, but not limited to:
    • making threats,
    • intimidation,
    • reprisals, or
    • taking other adverse action
  • against a person because of filing a complaint, participation in a complaint or the investigation of discrimination and/or harassment, sexual harassment, sexual conduct, or sexual violence.

OKLAHOMA STATE STATUTES

The following are the definitions as described in Oklahoma State Statues and not necessarily the definition the university has for these terms.

These definitions can be found in the Protection from Domestic Abuse Act and in the Domestic Abuse Reporting Act.

  • Assault: Assault is any willful and unlawful attempt or offer with force or violence to do a corporal hurt to another.
  • Domestic Abuse/Violence: Any act of physical harm, or threat of imminent physical harm which is committed by an adult, emancipated minor, or minor child thirteen (13) years of age or older against another adult, emancipated minor or minor child who are family or household members or who are or were in a dating relationships. (§22-60.1/§43-107.1)
  • “Family of household members” means:
    •  spouses,
    • ex-spouses,
    • present spouses of ex-spouses,
    • parents, including grandparents, stepparents, adoptive parents and foster parents,
    • children, including grandchildren, stepchildren, adoptive children and foster children,
    • persons otherwise related by blood or marriage,
    • persons living in the same household or who formerly lived in the same household, and
    • persons who are the biological parents of the same child, regardless of their marital status, or whether they have lived together at any time. This shall include the elderly and handicapped
  • “Dating relationship” means a courtship or engagement relationship. For purposes of this act, a casual acquaintance or ordinary fraternization between persons in a business of social context shall not constitute a dating relationship.
  • Harassment: A knowingly and willful course or pattern of conduct by a family or household member or an individual who is or has been involved in a dating relationship with the person, directed at a specific person which seriously alarms or annoys the person, and which serves no legitimate purpose. The course of conduct must be such as would cause a reasonable person to suffer substantial emotional distress, and must actually cause substantial distress to the person. “Harassment” shall include, but not be limited to, harassing or obscene telephone calls in violation of Section 1172 of Title 21 of the Oklahoma Statutes and fear of death or bodily harm
  • “Family of household members” means:
    • spouses,
    • ex-spouses,
    • present spouses of ex-spouses,
    • parents, including grandparents, stepparents, adoptive parents and foster parents,
    • children, including grandchildren, stepchildren, adoptive children and foster children,
    • persons otherwise related by blood or marriage,
    • persons living in the same household or who formerly lived in the same household, and
    • persons who are the biological parents of the same child, regardless of their marital status, or whether they have lived together at any time. This shall include the elderly and handicapped

 

  • “Dating relationship” means a courtship or engagement relationship. For purposes of this act, a casual acquaintance or ordinary fraternization between persons in a business of social context shall not constitute a dating relationship.
  • Stalking: The willful, malicious, and repeated following or harassment of a person by an adult, emancipated minor, or minor thirteen (13) years of age of older, in a manner that would cause a reasonable person to feel frightened, intimidated, threatened, harassed, or molested and actually causes the person being followed or harassed to feel terrorized, frightened, intimidated, threatened, harassed or molested. Stalking also means a course of conduct composed of a series of two or more separate acts over a period of time, however short, evidencing a continuity of purpose or unconsented contact with a person that is initiated or continued without the consent of the individual or in disregard of the expressed desire of the individual that the contact be avoided or discontinued. Unconsented contact or course of conduct includes, but is not limited to:
    • following or appearing within the sight of that individual,
    • approaching or confronting that individual in a public place or on private property,
    • appearing at the workplace or residence of that individual,
    • entering onto or remaining on property owned, leased, or occupied by that individual,
    • contacting that individual by telephone,
    • sending mail or electronic communications to that individual, or
    • placing an object on, or delivering an object to, property owned, leased or occupied by that individual
  • Rape is an act of sexual intercourse involving vaginal or anal penetration accomplished with a male or female who is not the spouse of the perpetrator and who may be of the same or the opposite sex as the perpetrator under any of the following circumstances:
  1.     Where the victim is under sixteen (16) years of age;
  2.     Where the victim is incapable through mental illness or any other unsoundness of mind, whether     temporary or permanent, of giving legal consent;
  3.     Where force or violence is used or threatened, accompanied by apparent power of execution to the victim     or to another person;
  4.     Where the victim is intoxicated by a narcotic or anesthetic agent, administered by or with the privity of the     accused as a means of forcing the victim to submit;
  5.     Where the victim is at the time unconscious of the nature of the act and this fact is known to the accused;
  6.     Where the victim submits to sexual intercourse under the belief that the person committing the act is a     spouse, and this belief is induced by artifice, pretense, or concealment practiced by the accused or by the     accused in collusion with the spouse with intent to induce that belief. In all cases of collusion between the     accused and the spouse to accomplish such act, both the spouse and the accused, upon conviction, shall be     deemed guilty of rape;
  7.     Where the victim is under the legal custody or supervision of a state agency, a federal agency, a county, a     municipality or a political subdivision and engages in sexual intercourse with a state, federal, county,     municipal or political subdivision employee or an employee of a contractor of the state, the federal     government, a county, a municipality or a political subdivision that exercises authority over the victim; or
  8.     Where the victim is at least sixteen (16) years of age and is less than twenty (20) years of age and is a     student, or under the legal custody or supervision of any public or private elementary or secondary school,     junior high or high school, or public vocational school, and engages in sexual intercourse with a person who is eighteen (18) years of age or older and is an employee of the same school system.

Rape is an act of sexual intercourse accomplished with a male or female who is the spouse of the perpetrator if force or violence is used or threatened, accompanied by apparent power of execution to the victim or to another person.

What is Consent?

The concept of consent is often misunderstood in comprehending the issues around sexual misconduct. Learning how to talk about consent, gain consent or refuse consent can help clarify each person’s responsibility which can minimize the risk of unwanted sexual contact.

Effective Consent is:

  • informed;
  • freely and actively given;
  • mutually understandable words or actions;
  • words which indicate a willingness or non willingness to participate in mutually agreed upon sexual activity.

A person CANNOT give consent:
(Regardless of what he or she might verbalize):

  • The person is incapacitated or unconscious as a result of alcohol and/or drugs
  • The person is mentally disabled to the extent that the person cannot understand the nature or the consequences of the sexual act
  • The person is not of age to give consent
  • Once a person says “no.” It does not matter if or what kind of sexual behavior has happened previously in the current event, earlier that day, or daily for the previous six months. It does not matter if it is a current long-term relationship, a broken relationship, or marriage. If one partner says, “NO,” and the other forces penetration it is rape.

What does consent mean in intimate relationships?

Consent is when one person agrees to or gives permission to another person to do something. Consent means agreeing to an action based on your knowledge of what that action involves, its likely consequences and having the option of saying no. The absence of “no” does not mean “yes”. Consent is a very important part of a sexual relationship. Each person is responsible for their own comfort and safety. Consent is an important part of healthy sexuality and both people should be involved in the decision to participate in sexual activity.

CONSENT IS…

  • A voluntary, sober, imaginative, enthusiastic, creative, wanted, informed, mutual, honest, and verbal agreement.
  • An active agreement: Consent cannot be coerced.
  • A process, which must be asked for every step of the way; if you want to move to the next level of sexual intimacy, just ask.
  • Never implied and cannot be assumed, even in the context of a relationship. Just because you are in a relationship does not mean that you have permission to have sex with your partner.

Kissing Doesn’t Always Need to Lead to Sex

Everyone has the right to say “no” and everyone has the right to change their mind at any time regardless of their past experiences with other people or the person they are with.

The Perks of Consent

  • Shows that you have respect for both yourself and your partner.
  • Enhances communication, respect, and honesty.
  • Having the ability to know and be able to communicate the type of sexual relationship you want.
  • The opportunity to acknowledge that you and your partner have sexual needs and desires.
  • The opportunity to identify your personal beliefs and values and respecting your partner’s personal beliefs and values.
  • Building confidence and self-esteem.
  • Challenging stereotypes that rape is a women’s issue.
  • Challenging sexism and traditional views on gender and sexuality.
  • Gaining positive views on sex and sexuality are empowering.
  • Eliminates the entitlement that one partner might feel over another. Neither your body nor your sexuality belong to anyone else.

What if the person you’re with is unable to give consent?

Drugs and alcohol can affect people’s ability to make decisions, including whether or not they want to be sexual with someone else. This means that if someone is really out of it, they cannot give consent.

Being with them in a sexual way when they don’t know what is going on is the same as rape.

If you see a person who is unable and is being intimate with someone, you should pull them aside and try your best to make sure that person is safe and knows what he or she is doing. If it’s the opposite situation, and your friend is trying to engage in a sexual encounter with someone who is out if it, you should try to pull them aside and stop them from continuing their behavior

Responsibility with Consent

Giving consent is not the sole responsibility of one person. An initiator of sexual activity is also responsible for obtaining effective consent before engaging in sexual behavior.

How do you know if the person you are with has given their consent?

The only way to know for sure if a person has given consent is if they tell you. It’s not always easy to let people know that you are not happy about something. Sometimes the person you’re with might look like they are happy doing something, but inside they are not. They might not know what to say or how to tell you that they are uncomfortable. The best way to determine if someone is uncomfortable or unwilling in any situation, especially a sexual one, is to simply ask. Here are some examples of the questions you might ask:

  • Is there anything you don’t want to do?
  • Are you comfortable?
  • Do you want to stop?
  • Do you want to go further?

However, if the person incapacitated (as described above) even if consent is verbalized, it is not consent!

Recognizing Non-Verbal Communication

There are many ways of communicating. The look on a person's face or their body language are also a way of communicating. Often non verbal communication has more meaning than the words that come out of their mouth.

Some examples of non verbal communication that signal a person is uncomfortable with the situation are:

  • Not responding to your touch
  • Pushing you away
  • Holding their arms tightly around their bodies
  • Turning away from you or hiding their face
  • Stiffening muscles

Asking questions and being aware of body language helps you to determine if the person is consenting and feeling comfortable, or not consenting and feeling uncomfortable. If you get a negative or non-committal answer to any of the questions above, or if the person's body language resembles any of the above examples, you should stop what you are doing and talk to them about it.

Slowing Things Down

Take your time. Making sure you are both comfortable and want the same thing, talk about how far you want to go. This will make the time you spend together more satisfying and enjoyable for you both. Things can move very quickly. Below are ways to say "slow down" if you feel that things are moving too quickly.

  • I don’t want to go any further than kissing, hugging, touching.
  • Let's just stay like this for a while.
  • Let's slow down.

Stopping

You always have the right to say “no”. You always have the right to change your mind at any time regardless of your past experience with the person or others. Below are some things you can say or do if you want so stop:

  • Say “No”
  • Say “I want to stop”
  • Say “I need to go to the bathroom/toilet”
  • In a situation where the other person isn’t listening to you and you feel unsafe, say you are feeling sick and might vomit.

Am I Being Stalked?

While legal definitions of stalking vary from one jurisdiction to another, stalking generally refers to a course of conduct that involves a broad range of behavior directed at the victim. The conduct can be varied and involve actions that harass, frighten, threaten and/or force the stalker into the life and consciousness of the victim.

Stalking behavior may be difficult to identify, since some can seem kind, friendly or romantic (e.g. sending cards, candy or flowers). However, if the object of the abuser’s attention has indicated s/he wants no contact, these behaviors may constitute stalking.

It is important to examine the pattern of behavior in the apparent stalking incidents – type of action, frequency, consistency, if the behavior stops when the stalker is told to cease contact, etc.

Indicators of Stalking Behavior

The following actions are some behaviors stalkers use. This is not an exhaustive list, and it is important to consider the intensity of each behaviors in deciding if stalking is the intent.

  • Persistent phone calls despite being told not to make contact in any form
  • Waiting for the victim at workplace, in the neighborhood/residence hall, after class, and where the stalker knows the victim goes
  • Threats to family, friends, property or pets of the victim. (Threats or actual abuse toward pets is a particularly strong indicator of potential to escalate to more or lethal violence)
  • Manipulative behavior (e.g. threatening to commit suicide in order to get a response).
  • Defamation: The stalker often lies to others about the victim (e.g. reporting infidelity to the victim's partner)
  • Sending the victim written messages, such as letters, email, graffiti, text messages, IMs, etc
  • Objectification: The stalker demeans the victim, reducing him/her to an object, allowing the stalker to feel angry with the victim without experiencing empathy
  • Sending unwanted gifts

What to do if someone is stalking you.

  • Don’t answer the phone or door unless you know who it is.
  • End all communication with the person who is stalking you. Don’t get into arguments with them or pay attention to them – that’s what they want!
  • Let family, friends, and your employer know you are being stalked. Show them a picture of the stalker.
  • Talk to a teacher, friend, administrator or counselor who can help you decide how to deal with the situation.
  • Write down the times, places, and detailed summaries of each incident. Keep all emails or texts.
  • Contact the police if stalking persists despite your efforts to end it.
  • Consider obtaining a restraining order, but evaluate the pros and cons of doing so. Sometimes it can escalate the violence.
  • Change your routine so the stalker is less able to predict your whereabouts.
  • Keep any written messages (including electronic) and recorded voice communications

What to do about cyber stalking

  • Do not meet anyone you've met on the internet in person.
  • Don’t share personal information (name, phone numbers, addresses, etc.) in online public places.
  • Consider creating separate email accounts for social networking sites or other sites that require personal logins. (Good way to reduce your spam too!)
  • Use filters and blockers to block unwanted emails.
  • Send a clear message to a cyber stalker that you do not want further communication and will contact authorities if messaging continues.
  • Save all communications from a cyber stalker.

Domestic/Dating Violence

It could be abuse if... 

Relationship (Domestic) and Dating Violence (DV)

Relationship violence is a pattern of behavior in which one partner uses fear and intimidation to establish power and control over the other partner. This often includes the threat or use of violence. This abuse happens when one person believes they are entitled to control another. It may or may not include sexual assault.

Relationship violence can occur in straight/heterosexual relationships, same-sex/gender relationships and in intimate relationships that do not involve romantic feelings. Intimate partner violence can happen with roommates, friends, classmates, or teammates. Relationship violence impacts people of all ethnicities, races, classes, abilities and nationalities.

Although there are some general patterns in domestic or dating violence, there is no typical abusive behavior. To wear down and control his/her victim, an abuser may use emotional harassment, physical contact, intimidation, or other means. The controlling behavior usually escalates, particularly if the object of the abuse tries to resist or leave.

Relationship (Domestic) and Dating Violence on a College Campus

Many times, when people hear 'domestic violence' they imagine a couple hitting and screaming, leaving bruises or even a hospital visit.  Typically, that is not what DV looks like a college campus. It is imperative to remember that DV escalates over time, meaning it doesn’t start all of the sudden with physical violence. There are usually early warning signs of a potentially abusive relationship.

Often, control is the earliest indicator of a potentially volatile partner. This might look like a partner being obsessive about checking your phone, looking at your Facebook page or other social media, checking your email, etc.  It might come across as 'cute' that your partner cares so much for you that he/she just wants to know everything you're doing.  However, there is a line that you need to pay attention to in order to recognize these early warning signs.

Another early indicator is isolation.  If a partner doesn’t want you spending time with friends or family and you begin to feel isolated, like you can’t talk to anyone but your partner without causing a fight or making your partner jealous, this is a problem.  Many abusive partners use isolation as a control mechanism to make it feel harder to leave the relationship.  Especially in college where many people are far away from home and family, isolation can be a very influential means of control.

Keep reading about these definitions, but remember to think about how they might play on a college campus as opposed to what you see in movies or in the media.  Also, if you have a friend you suspect to be in an abusive relationship, check out the Supporting DV Victims page to see how you can help.

Types and Forms of Relationship Violence

Relationship violence is a crime. Behaviors that are used to maintain fear, intimidation, and power over another person may include threats, economic abuse, sexual abuse or taking advantage of privilege. These behaviors may take the form of physical, sexual, emotional, and/or psychological violence.

General descriptions of the types of domestic and dating violence are as follows:

Physical violence: The abuser’s physical attacks or aggressive behavior can range from bruising to murder. It often begins with what is excused as trivial contacts, which escalate into more frequent and serious attacks. Physical abuse may include, but is not limited to, pushing, shoving, hitting, kicking, choking, restraining with force, or throwing things.

Sexual abuse: Physical attack is often accompanied by or culminates in some type of sexual intercourse with the victim, or forcing her/him to take part in unwanted sexual activity. Sexual violence may include, but is not limited to, treating the victim and other people as objects via actions and remarks, using sexual names, insisting on dressing or not dressing in a certain ways, touching in ways that make a person uncomfortable, rape, or accusing the victim of sexual activity with others.

Emotional or Psychological violence: The abuser’s psychological or mental attack may include constant verbal abuse, harassment, excessive possessiveness, isolation from friends and family, deprivation of physical and economic resources, and destruction of personal property. Emotional or psychological abuse may include, but is not limited to, withholding approval, appreciation, or affection as punishment; ridiculing her/his most valued beliefs, religion, race, or heritage; humiliating and criticizing her/him in public or private; or controlling all her/his actions and decisions.

It Could Be Intimate Partner Abuse If….

One person:

  • Constantly blames his/her partner for everything - including his/her own abusive behavior/temper.
  • Makes mean and degrading comments about a partner's appearance, beliefs or accomplishments.
  • Controls money and time.
  • Gets extremely jealous of everyone, i.e. friends, family, etc.
  • Isolates a partner.
  • Loses his/her temper.
  • Is obsessive of a partner.
  • Physically and/or sexually assaults another.

Or the other person:

  • Gives up things that are important to her/him, including friends, family, hobbies, etc.
  • Cancels plans with friends.
  • Becomes isolated from family and/or friends.
  • Worries about making her/his partner angry.
  • Shows signs of physical abuse like bruises or cuts.
  • Feels embarrassed or ashamed about what's going on in her/his relationship.
  • Consistently makes excuses for her/his partner’s behavior

Information from Oklahoma State University website, http://1is2many.okstate.edu

Reporting

All forms of sexual harassment, including sexual violence, should be reported, no matter the severity.  Northwestern Oklahoma State University’s primary concern is safety; therefore individuals should not be deterred from reporting even if the use of alcohol or drugs was involved. 

The university encourages victims of sexual violence to talk to someone about what happened so they can receive support and so the university can respond appropriately.  The university offers both confidential and non-confidential reporting options.  It is important to be aware that different individuals who victims can contact for assistance following an incident may have different responsibilities regarding confidentiality, depending on their position.  Under state law, some individuals can assure a victim of confidentiality, including counselors and certified victims’ advocates.  In general, however, any other university employee cannot guarantee complete confidentiality, unless specifically provided by law.  Universities must balance the needs of the individual victim with an obligation to protect the safety and well-being of the community.

Different employees on campus have different abilities to maintain a victim’s confidentiality.

  • Some are required to maintain near complete confidentiality; talking to them is sometimes called a “privileged communication”.
  • Other employees may talk to a victim in confidence, and generally report only that an incident occurred without revealing any personally identifying information.  Disclosures to these employees will not trigger a university investigation into an incident against the victim’s wishes.  This report is done through a Clery Report and does not include the victim’s name or other identifying information.
  • Thirdly, some employees are required to report all the details of an incident (including the identities of both the victim and alleged perpetrator) to the Title IX Coordinator.
  1. Confidential Reporting Options

    Confidential reporting options provide students with the ability to confidentially report and discuss an instance of sexual harassment, including sexual violence, without their information being shared with others.  Please note confidential reporting limits the university’s ability to respond to incidents.
    Professional Counselors
    Professional and licensed counselors who provide mental-health counseling (including those who act in that role under the supervision of a licensed counselor) are not required to report any information about an incident to the Title IX Coordinator without the victim’s permission.  These individuals are also not required by the Clery Act to report.

    This would include counselors in NWOSU Counseling Services.

    NWOSU Victim Advocate
    The university treats the NWOSU Victim Advocate as a confidential reporting option.  Victims can visit with the victim advocate to learn about resources available on campus.  The Victim Advocate is not required to report any information about an incident to the Title IX Coordinator without a victim’s permission.  However, the victim advocate will report incidents, without personally identifiable information, to NWOSU Police for purpose of the Clery Act. 
  1. Non-Confidential Reporting Options

    The Clery Act requires all employees (excluding counselor, health care providers and victim advocate) who become aware of an instance of sexual harassment including sexual violence to report the instance to NWOSU Police.  The victim’s name should not be reported to the police without the victim’s permission.  The report should include the nature, date, time, and general location of an incident.  This is a limited report that includes no information that would directly or indirectly identify the victim.  This allows for the university to track patterns, evaluate the program, and develop appropriate campus-wide responses.

When an instance of sexual harassment including sexual violence is reported to a “responsible employee,” a student can expect the incident will be reported to the university’s Title IX Coordinator.  A “responsible employee” is an employee who has the authority to redress sexual harassment including sexual violence, who has the duty to report incidents of sexual harassment or other student misconduct, or who a student could reasonably believe has this authority or duty.  Examples include but are not limited to faculty members, advisors, employees in student services offices and anyone in a supervisory role.  NWOSU considers all employees to be responsible employees.

A responsible employee must report to the Title IX Coordinator all relevant details about the alleged sexual harassment or sexual violence shared by the victim including names, date, time and specific location of the alleged incident.

To the extent possible, information reported to a responsible employee will be shared only with people responsible for handling the university’s response to the report.  A responsible employee should not share information about the victim to law enforcement unless a victim requests.

When a victim tells a responsible employee about an incident of sexual harassment or sexual violence, the victim has the right to expect the university will investigate the alleged sexual harassment, end any sexual harassment, prevent the sexual harassment from recurring, and educate on sexual harassment.

Before a victim reveals any information to a responsible employee, the employee should ensure that the victim understands the employee’s reporting obligations and if the victim wants to maintain confidentiality, then the victim should be directed to a confidential resource.

Requests for Confidentiality from a Non-Confidential Reporter

If a victim discloses an incident to a responsible employee but wishes to maintain confidentiality or requests that no investigation or conduct action be taken, the university must weigh that request against the obligation to provide a safe environment for all students, including the victim.

If the university honors the request for confidentiality, a victim must understand that the university’s ability to meaningfully investigate and respond to the incident may be limited.

Although rare, there are times when the university may not be able to honor a victim’s request in order to provide a safe environment for all students.

When weighing a victim’s request for confidentiality or that no investigation or conduct process be pursued, the following will be considered:

  • The increased risk that the alleged respondent will commit additional acts of sexual or other violence such as:
  • whether there have been other sexual violence complaints about the same alleged respondent;
  • whether the alleged respondent has a history of arrests or records from a prior school indicating a history of violence;
  • whether the alleged respondent threatened further sexual violence or other violence against the victim or others;
  • whether the sexual violence was committed by multiple respondents;
  • whether the sexual violence was perpetrated with a weapon;
  • whether the victim is a minor;
  • whether the university possesses other means to obtain relevant information of the sexual violence (e.g., security cameras, personnel, physical evidence); and
  • whether the victim’s report reveals a pattern of perpetration (e.g., vial illicit use of drugs or alcohol) at a given location or by a particular group.

The presence of one or more of these factors could lead the university to investigate and, if appropriate, pursue conduct action.  If none of these factors is present, the university will likely respect the victim’s request for confidentiality.

If determined that the university cannot maintain a victim’s confidentiality, the university will inform the victim prior to starting an investigation.  The university will remain ever mindful of the victim’s well-being, and will take ongoing steps to protect the victims from retaliation or harm and work with the victim to create a safety plan.  The university may not require a victim to participate in any investigation.  Retaliation against the victim, whether by students or university employees, will not be tolerated.

Reporting to the Police

The university strongly encourages individuals to report sexual violence and any other criminal offenses to the police.  This does not commit a victim to prosecute but will allow the gathering of information and evidence.  The information and evidence preserve future options regarding criminal prosecution, university conduct actions and/or civil actions against the perpetrator.

On campus incidents can be reported to NWOSU Campus Police in the Student Center Building or at 580-327-8511.  If the incident occurred elsewhere in Alva, it can be reported to the Alva Police Department at 580-327-2064.  If the incident happened anywhere else, it can be reported to local law enforcement with jurisdiction in the location where it occurred. 

Please know that the information reported can be helpful in supporting other reports and preventing further incidents.

Reporting to Title IX

Anyone can report instances of sexual harassment and sexual violence to the Title IX Coordinator in the Fine Arts Building, Room 126 or at 580-327-8415.  A complaint should be filed as soon as possible, preferably within 180 calendar days of the incident.  A complaint can be filed online at http://www.nwosu.edu/forms/nwosu-studentemployee-general-complaint-form or in person in the Fine Arts Building, Room 126.

The university strongly encourages individuals to report any instances of sexual harassment and sexual violence to the police.

Information from Oklahoma State University website, http://1is2many.okstate.edu

Campus Resources

ON AND OFF CAMPUS RESOURCES

Sexual harassment and sexual violence can be emotionally disruptive, and it takes time to come to terms with such major stress.  In addition to support that may be found in family and friends, the following agencies and departments can serve as resources.

It is important to be aware that different individuals who one may contact for assistance following an incident may have different responsibilities regarding confidentiality depending on their position.  Under state law, some individuals can assure the victim confidentiality, including counselors and certified victim’s advocates.  In general, however, any other university employee cannot guarantee complete confidentiality, unless specifically provided by law.  Universities must balance the needs of the individual victim with an obligation to protect the safety and well-being of the community at large.  See Reporting for more information.

NWOSU Victim Advocate – Confidential Reporting Option

NWOSU’s Victim Advocate that can confidentially provide students with information about on and off campus resources available to victims.

Karmen Thomas – Northwest Domestic Crisis Services 580-327-6648 (After 5 p.m. weekdays and on the weekends 888-256-1215).

Counseling Resources – Confidential Reporting Options

NWOSU Counseling Services – Fine Arts Building, Room 207, 580-327-8439.

A counselor is available 24-hours a day.  Call NWOSU Campus Police at 580-327-8511 to reach the on-call counselor after 5 p.m. weekdays and on the weekends.

Other Local Services Available To Victims – Nonconfidential Reporting Options

NWOSU Campus Police Department (Alva) – Student Center Building, 580-327-8511

NWOSU Campus Police Department (Enid) – Located in the campus building, 580-327-2121

Alva Police Department – 415 4th St. Ste. A, 580-327-2064

Woodward Police Department – 1219 8th St., 580-254-8518

Enid Police Department – 301 W Owen K Garriott Rd, 580-242-7000

Title IX Coordinator – Fine Arts Building, Room 126, 580-327-8415

Medical Services

It’s important to have a thorough medical examination after a sexual assault even if you do not have any apparent physical injuries.  Medical providers can treat any injuries and provide tests for sexually transmitted diseases. 

Share Medical Center (Alva) – 800 Share Drive, 580-327-2800

Integris Bass Baptist (Enid) – 600 S. Monroe Street, 580-233-2300

Woodward Regional Hospital (Woodward) – 900 17th Street, 580-254-8406

Reference http://notalone.gov for more information and resources.

Title IX Coordinator

Anyone can report instances of sexual harassment and sexual violence to the Title IX Coordinator in the Fine Arts Building, Room 126 or at 580-327-8415.  A complaint should be filed as soon as possible, preferably within 180 calendar days of the incident.  A complaint can be filed online at http://www.nwosu.edu/forms/nwosu-studentemployee-general-complaint-form or in person in the Fine Arts Building, Room 126.

The university strongly encourages individuals to report any instances of sexual harassment and sexual violence to the police.

Information from Oklahoma State University website, http://1is2many.okstate.edu.

Title IX Coordinator

Title IX Coordinator
Calleb Mosburg
Fine Arts 126
(580) 327-8415
cnmosburg@nwosu.edu

Reporting to Title IX
Anyone can report instances of sexual harassment and sexual violence to the Title IX Coordinator in the Fine Arts Building, Room 126 or at 580-327-8415.  A complaint should be filed as soon as possible, preferably within 180 calendar days of the incident.  A complaint can be filed online at http://www.nwosu.edu/forms/nwosu-studentemployee-general-complaint-form or in person in the Fine Arts Building, Room 126.

The university strongly encourages individuals to report any instances of sexual harassment and sexual violence to the police.

Title IX of the Education Amendment of 1972

“No person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance.”

Both Title IX and University Policy prohibit discrimination in services or benefits offered by the University based upon gender.

Sexual harassment is a form of gender discrimination and therefore prohibited under Title IX.  Sexual harassment is defined as unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, or other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature.

The following are examples of types of conduct that may constitute sexual harassment:

  • Inappropriate touching, patting, or pinching
  • Physical assault or coerced sexual activity
  • Demands or subtle pressure for sexual favors
  • Obscene phone calls, texts, email, or gestures

Any person (student, faculty, staff, or guest) who believes that discriminatory practices have been engaged in based upon gender may discuss these concerns and file informal or formal complaints of possible violations of Title IX with the Title IX Coordinator.

It is the policy of this university to provide equal employment and educational opportunity on the basis of merit without discrimination because of age, race, ethnicity, color, sex, religion, national origin, sexual orientation, veterans’ status, or disability.

To read more about Title IX, visit the Oklahoma State University Title IX website.  Title IX can be very confusing and is very lengthy!  We want you to be as informed as possible, so if you have specific questions, please reach out to Student Conduct (student.conduct@okstate.edu or 405-744-5470) or the Title IX coordinator (eeo@okstate.edu or 405-744-9153).  You can also visit NotAlone.gov to learn much more about how Title IX applies to your education or employment in a user friendly manner.

Information from Oklahoma State University website, http://1is2many.okstate.edu

Guidelines for University Employees

Supporting Students as University Employees

As an NWOSU employee, when an incident of sexual harassment or other crime is reported to you, there are three simple steps that you should follow to ensure that you have fulfilled your obligations.

  1. Get the facts.
  2. Inform the individual you must report the incident and provide them resources.
  3. Report the incident to the appropriate individuals

1.  Get the facts

First, please know that if a crime is currently ongoing or you feel that it is an emergency, call 911. 

Assuming that there is not an ongoing emergency, you must first get the facts of the incident.  Facts would include the date and time the incident occurred, where the incident occurred, the details of what occurred, and the date it was reported to you.  This information is critically important to determine if this incident has been previously reported by others.

You do not have to prove what happened or who was at fault, the appropriate and appointed individuals will investigate.  In addition, do not try to apprehend the alleged individual of a crime.

2.  Inform the individual you must report the incident and provide resources

Please ensure that you tell the person reporting the incident to you that you must report what happened.  An example of what to say: 

“I need to let you know that I am required to report what you have shared with me to NWOSU Campus Police for the purpose of crime statistics.  I will not be reporting your name to NWOSU Campus Police unless you provide consent for me to do so.  However, NWOSU Policy and federal laws requires that I report all of what you have shared with me to the appropriate university officials [Title IX Coordinator].”

There is a distinct difference between what the Clery Act requires university officials to report to NWOSU Campus Police and what Title IX requires university officials to report internally.

When reporting to the police, the Clery Act does not require the victim’s name unless the victim consents.  If more information is needed after you report, you might be asked to follow up with the victim or ask to share their name so the police can follow up.  Know that the data compiled at the end of the year in the annual security report contains no names of either the victims or perpetrators.

When reporting to the Title IX Coordinator, Title IX requires that you provide both the victim and alleged individual’s names and details of what you know.  The university is required to take immediate and appropriate steps to investigate what occurred and take prompt and effective action to:

  • End the harassment,
  • Prevent any recurrence and
  • Remedy the effects.

The university will not be able to fulfill its federal requirements and maintain a safe living and learning environment if you do not share all the information.

Lastly, there are a number of campus and community resources available to victims of crimes.  Please inform the individual about their option to report directly to law enforcement themselves; however you do not need to convince the person reporting this to you to speak to the police if they are unwilling to do so. 

3.  Report the incident to the appropriate individuals

After the facts have been collected and the individual has been informed of the report and provided resources, you now must report the incident to the appropriate officials [Title IX Coordinator].

Resources for University Employees

WHO TO CONTACT ABOUT SEXUAL HARASSMENT AND SEXUAL VIOLENCE

Report all incidences to the Title IX Coordinator in the Fine Arts Building, Room 126 or at 580-327-8415.

CLERY REPORTING

University employee’s obligations to report criminal activity extend beyond the obligation to report sexual harassment and sexual violence.  Under the Clery Act, university employees are also required to report the following crimes to the NWOSU Police Department:

  • Sex offenses
  • Stalking
  • Dating violence
  • Domestic violence
  • Aggravated assaults
  • Hate Crimes
  • Burglary
  • Motor vehicle theft
  • Robbery
  • Arson
  • Criminal homicide
  • Arrests and disciplinary referrals for violations of liquor, drug and weapon laws
  • The reporter does not need to make a determination on the specific crime; they just need to report it. 

Generally speaking, the Clery Act has exhaustive guidance regarding locations of crimes and what must be reported.  In order to simplify this guidance, if you become aware of one of these crimes on campus or off campus but closely related to the university, err on the side of caution and report it.

Under normal circumstances when a crime is reported – the Police are called and speak to all involved parties.  Once the police are called your reporting requirements are met and there is no need to call the police.  But there are times when victims simply are not ready to speak to the police.  This is not uncommon and we do not coerce individuals to report.  You must still report the crime as best you can.

The Clery Act also includes requirements regarding reporting of missing students.  Any employee who receives a report of a missing student should call NWOSU Campus Police immediately. 

Information from Oklahoma State University website, http://1is2many.okstate.edu

1is2many Campaign

NWOSU Resources

Confidential:

NWOSU Victim Advocate: Karmen Thomas, (580) 327-6648; 1-800-256-1215; nwdcs@cneconnect.com

Non-Confidential:

Campus Police: (580) 327-8511, Student Center


The 1 is 2 Many campaign began as a White House initiative in response to the increased attention around sexual violence on college campuses.  Northwestern Oklahoma State University heard this message and responded. The message is clear that one victim is too many and that Northwestern Oklahoma State does not condone any form of sexual violence in our campus community.  Thus, the 1 is 2 Many campaign has become pervasive throughout campus as a part of who we are here at NWOSU.

The campaign approaches primary prevention and education on several levels in a variety of fashions with both direct and active prevention to awareness prevention.

You can visit the Not Alone website to learn more about the 1 is 2 Many campaign on a national level.

Bystander Intervention

Be an intervener! Stop these incidents before they occur, and talk to your friends about it so that they will intervene as well! Our goal is to change the culture on the OSU campus by creating a community of leaders and active bystanders. The in-person 1 is 2 Many Presentation goes over specific examples, training you to become an active bystander. We encourage you to request a presentation so that you can begin making a difference on the OSU campus today! Email student.conduct@okstate.edu or call 405-744-5470 to book a presentation and read more below.

The Bystander Effect predicts that people are  less likely to help others when there are more people around a potentially dangerous situation. There are many reasons people might not step up to intervene in these situations. First, here is the thought process someone needs to have before making a conscious decision to intervene:

1. Notice a critical situation
Bystanders first must notice the incident taking place. It's important to become attune to what situations may be risky.  For example, if you're at a party, and you see someone stumbling as they're being led into a different room or your friend has a partner that is very controlling. These are potentially dangerous situations that need attention. However, sometimes it can be hard to recognize them as dangerous if you’re unsure of what’s happening.

2. Recognize that situation as problematic
By "problematic," we mean a situation wherein there is risk of sexual or domestic violence occurring in the near future.

3. Develop a feeling of personal responsibility to do something
It has been found that often, people believe that someone else will help in a situation where there are many people around. This is especially true if you do not directly know the potential victim.  However, it is important to realize that others may also be thinking the same thing. If you're unsure if you should do something, ask a friend what they think -- it might be the case that they've been thinking the same thing.

4. Believe you have the skills and knowledge to intervene
There are a number of different techniques that someone can use to intervene in a risky situation, some are listed below.  There is always something you can do to help, even if it is just to pick up your phone and call the police.  Further, by reading this information and requestion a presentation to become officially trained in Bystander Intervention, you are much more likely to help those around you.

5. Consciously decide to help
The choice to intervene is an intentional decision reached through this process.

There are many thoughts that might interrupt this process. Think about whether or not you have ever thought of any of the following reasons or heard others describe these thoughts...

Pluralistic Ignorance
"Nobody else thinks this is a problem..." Many times, people think that no else thinks the situation is a problem because no one is stepping in to stop it. So, many people may internally disagree with a situation, but outwardly do nothing.

Embarrassment
"I don't want to embarrass myself..." Often, people are afraid of embarrassing themselves or those involved in the situation. This is a very legitimate fear, but it is important to weigh the consequences of a potentially embarrassing moment with the consequences of experiencing sexual violence or other harmful situations.

Diffusion of Responsibility
"Someone else will take care of that..." Shockingly, research shows that the more people there are witnessing a potentially dangerous situation, the less likely it is that anyone individual will intervene because people assume that someone else will take care of it.

Fear of Getting Hurt
"What if I get hurt trying to help…" This is a very legitimate fear that we want you to consider.  We always, always, always want you to consider your personal safety before intervening. However, there is always something you can do to help, even if it is simply calling the police. You can read below to find out more about safe ways to intervene.

So, what can you do to intervene?
The following are steps you can take to keep yourself and others around you safe.

  • Educate yourself about interpersonal violence AND share this info with friends
  • Confront friends who make excuses for other peoples abusive behavior
  • Speak up against racist, sexist, and homophobic jokes or remarks

When attempting to  help, you should also think about the 4 D's of intervention:

  • Distract - Find a way to distract the participants from what is happening. This could look like changing the subject, mentioning another activity like getting food, or others actions.
  • Delegate - If you are not comfortable intervening, find someone who is. You might call law enforcement or other friends, talk to the bartender, or talk to others around.
  • Delay - If you are not sure you should intervene, try to delay the situation until you can get more information. This might look like going to the bathroom with a potential victim, turning on a TV, or other behaviors.
  • Direct - If you feel comfortable, the best way might be to directly intervene and ask those involved what is going on.

Remember, any situation that threatens physical harm to yourself or another student should be assessed carefully. Always consider your personal safety before intervening. Contact NWOSU Campus Police at (580) 327-8511 if assistance is needed.

Read the following examples to get a better understanding of some specific ways you might help.

Example 1:

You are at a party and you see a woman who is obviously very intoxicated, falling over herself, slurring speech, etc., being pulled up the stairs towards private bedrooms by a man. What would you do?

Distract: Who wants pizza??
Delay: Go up to them and say you are about to puke and you need the girl to come with you to the bathroom.
Direct: Go up to the guy and ask him what he is doing.
Direct: Go up to the woman and tell her you need to talk with her in private.
Delegate: Tell the woman’s friend and suggest that she go get her.

Example 2:

You are walking into your residence hall and you see a couple you know standing nearby. One of them is becoming increasingly angry and aggressive towards the other, perhaps even beginning to shove or push the other. What would you do?

Direct: Approach the couple and explain that this behavior is unacceptable and you will call the police if it does not stop.
Delegate: Get a friend or two to come help you see what’s up or call your RA.
Distract: Turn on a nearby TV or ask to borrow something from one of them.
Delay: Approach them and strike up a conversation about class or sports.

Example 3:

You are at a party or bar and you see someone put something that looked like drugs into someone's drink when they were not looking. What would you do?

Direct: You confront the person who slipped the drug and say you saw them do it and you’re going to call the cops or you tell the person whose drink was drugged.
Distract: You “accidentally” spill the drink.
Delay: You strike up a conversation with the person whose drink was drugged before they begin to drink.
Delegate: You tell the bartender what you saw and ask him/her to do something.

Tips for intervening
In a situation potentially involving sexual assault, relationship violence, or stalking:

  • Approach everyone as a friend
  • Do not be antagonistic
  • Avoid using violence
  • Be honest and direct whenever possible
  • Recruit help if necessary
  • Keep yourself safe
  • If things get out of hand or become too serious, contact the police

You can also read about the STEP UP! program at http://www.stepupprogram.org.

STEP UP! is a prosocial behavior and bystander intervention program that educates students to be proactive in helping others. Teaching people about the determinants of prosocial behavior makes them more aware of why they sometimes don’t help. As a result they are more likely to help in the future.

Information from Oklahoma State University website, http://1is2many.okstate.edu

Northwestern Oklahoma State University

709 Oklahoma Blvd., Alva, OK 73717
Phone: (580) 327-1700

© 2008-2017 Northwestern Oklahoma State
University. All Rights Reserved.

Mission Statement

Northwestern Oklahoma State University provides quality educational and cultural opportunities to learners with diverse needs by cultivating ethical leadership and service, critical thinking and fiscal responsibility.

Proud Member of RUSO