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School of Arts & Sciences

Institutional Structure, Designations, and Duties

The titles and designations of those participating in the activities of the Institute and the Journal follow:

  1. the Chair of the Institute will be the NWOSU Department of Social Sciences Chair who is responsible for allocating funds from endowments via the NWOSU Foundation to the Institute as they become available;

  2. two Executive Directors of the Institute will be responsible for conducting the Institute’s daily operations, and they will also serve as the Senior Editors of Civitas, making all decisions concerning the Journal;

  3. a select group of Review Board Members of the Journal will be determined by the Executive Directors;

  4. all faculty members within the NWOSU Department of Social Sciences will be designated as Assistant Review Board Members of the Journal; and

  5. the Executive Directors will establish as well as serve on a several-member Advisory Board to promote an exchange of ideas on and recommendations for future Institute projects and activities.

The current personnel of the Institute and Journal include:

Chair:

Dr. Kay Decker, Chair of the Department of Social Sciences, Northwestern Oklahoma State University (Alva) 

Dr. Kay Decker is Chair of the Social Sciences Department and Professor of Sociology at Northwestern Oklahoma State University (NWOSU). She earned a B.A.Ed. in Social Science Education from Northwestern Oklahoma State University, an M.S. in Sociology from Oklahoma State University, and an Ed.D. in Occupational and Adult Education from Oklahoma State University.

Dr. Decker has served as a NWOSU faculty member since 1991. Prior to joining the faculty at NWOSU, she served as Program Coordinator and Caseworker for Northwest Oklahoma Eldercare which covered three counties in northwest Oklahoma. She is also Executive Director of Freedom West Community Development Corporation, a 501(c)(3) non-profit development entity serving five counties in northwest Oklahoma.

Dr. Decker’s areas of specialization include Racial and Ethnic Studies/Social Diversity, Anthropology and American Indians of the Southwest, Social Gerontology, Social Theory and Research Methods, Rural Sociology, and Community Development. Her research and writing covers Rural Community Development, Grant Writing and Program Management, Strategic Planning and Asset Mapping, Cultural Heritage and Historic Preservation. She has written and received grants for community development and affordable housing programs in excess of $6.2 million over the past decade from federal, state, and regional funders as well as the private philanthropic sector.

Dr. Decker is President of the Board of Directors of Preservation Oklahoma (statewide historic preservation non-profit), Vice President of the Board of Directors of the Cherokee Strip Museum Association, Chair of the Board of Directors of Woods County Economic Development Committee, and past President of the Oklahoma Sociology Association.

Co-Executive Directors:

Dr. Aaron Mason, Professor of Political Science, Northwestern Oklahoma State University

Dr. Aaron Mason holds a B.A. from Northeastern State University in Tahlequah, Oklahoma, an M.A. from the University of Texas at Arlington, and a Ph.D. from Northern Arizona University in Flagstaff. His research interests include American Politics, the U.S. Constitution, the Founding Fathers and the American Civil War. He has made academic presentations at Oklahoma Research Day, the Western Social Science Association, the Arkansas Political Science Association, and many others. Active in the Oklahoma Political Science Association, he has published articles and papers for Oklahoma Politics and Kendall Hunt. He has held jobs in the public and private sectors is proud of co-ordinating the annual Constitution Day observances held at NWOSU each September. He lives in Alva with his wife DeeAnn and their two children, Hannah and Morgan.


Dr. Eric J. Schmaltz, Professor of History, Northwestern Oklahoma State University

Dr. Eric J. Schmaltz teaches Modern European and World History. Both sides of his family claim some Black Sea German ancestry, and their odyssey across half the globe influenced him to pursue the history profession.  Though born in North Dakota, he has lived in several states over the years (in some of them more than once), including Maryland, Arizona, Nebraska, Iowa, and Minnesota as well as time abroad as an exchange student at the University of Paderborn in Germany.  He earned a B.A. (1994) in History and German Language with honors at Saint Olaf College in Northfield, Minnesota.  Following his M.A. (1996) in History at the University of North Dakota in Grand Forks, he completed a Ph.D. (2002) in History at the University of Nebraska in Lincoln.  He specializes in Modern Germany and Modern Russia with an emphasis on ethnic and nationality studies, particularly German minorities in Russia and the former USSR.  He has also recently taken a greater interest in topics concerning Diasporas and transnationalism.

Despite significant teaching commitments, Schmaltz speaks at numerous conferences and public events.  He has also produced a variety of articles and German- and Russian-language translations for publication in the American Historical Society of Germans from Russia (AHSGR) in Lincoln, Nebraska, the Germans from Russia Heritage Society (GRHS) in Bismarck, North Dakota, and the Germans from Russia Heritage Collection at the North Dakota State University (GRHC NDSU) Libraries in Fargo.  Other articles, reviews, and translations have appeared either online or in newsletters, local newspapers, interdisciplinary journals such as Ethnic and Racial Studies, Eurasia Studies Society Journal, Holocaust and Genocide Studies, Journal of Environmental Assessment Policy and Management, Journal of Genocide Research, Nationalities Papers, Oklahoma Politics, and Yearbook of the Society for German American Studies, as well as major international anthologies on the Holocaust by Berghahn Books and K. G. Saur Verlag.  In 2003, the GRHC NDSU Libraries in Fargo published his first monograph, An Expanded Bibliography and Reference Guide for the Former Soviet Union’s Germans: Issues of Ethnic Autonomy, Group Repression, Cultural Assimilation and Mass Emigration in the Twentieth Century and Beyond.  In addition to writing articles, he is currently working on three major book projects, two as editor and one as co-author. 
 

Schmaltz is co-executive director of the endowed Northwestern Oklahoma State University (NWOSU) Institute for Citizenship Studies.  He also serves as editor of GRHS Heritage Review, editorial board member of the AHSGR Journal of the American Historical Society of Germans from Russia, and member of the Board of Academic Advisors at the Center for Volga German Studies at Concordia University in Portland, Oregon.  Moreover, he is a member of the Society for German American Studies (SGAS) and the World History Association (WHA).

Senior Editors:

Dr. Aaron Mason, Professor of Political Science, Northwestern Oklahoma State University

Dr. Aaron Mason holds a B.A. from Northeastern State University in Tahlequah, Oklahoma, an M.A. from the University of Texas at Arlington, and a Ph.D. from Northern Arizona University in Flagstaff. His research interests include American Politics, the U.S. Constitution, the Founding Fathers and the American Civil War. He has made academic presentations at Oklahoma Research Day, the Western Social Science Association, the Arkansas Political Science Association, and many others. Active in the Oklahoma Political Science Association, he has published articles and papers for Oklahoma Politics and Kendall Hunt. He has held jobs in the public and private sectors is proud of co-ordinating the annual Constitution Day observances held at NWOSU each September. He lives in Alva with his wife DeeAnn and their two children, Hannah and Morgan.


Dr. Eric J. Schmaltz, Professor of History, Northwestern Oklahoma State University

Dr. Eric J. Schmaltz teaches Modern European and World History. Both sides of his family claim some Black Sea German ancestry, and their odyssey across half the globe influenced him to pursue the history profession.  Though born in North Dakota, he has lived in several states over the years (in some of them more than once), including Maryland, Arizona, Nebraska, Iowa, and Minnesota as well as time abroad as an exchange student at the University of Paderborn in Germany.  He earned a B.A. (1994) in History and German Language with honors at Saint Olaf College in Northfield, Minnesota.  Following his M.A. (1996) in History at the University of North Dakota in Grand Forks, he completed a Ph.D. (2002) in History at the University of Nebraska in Lincoln.  He specializes in Modern Germany and Modern Russia with an emphasis on ethnic and nationality studies, particularly German minorities in Russia and the former USSR.  He has also recently taken a greater interest in topics concerning Diasporas and transnationalism.

Despite significant teaching commitments, Schmaltz speaks at numerous conferences and public events.  He has also produced a variety of articles and German- and Russian-language translations for publication in the American Historical Society of Germans from Russia (AHSGR) in Lincoln, Nebraska, the Germans from Russia Heritage Society (GRHS) in Bismarck, North Dakota, and the Germans from Russia Heritage Collection at the North Dakota State University (GRHC NDSU) Libraries in Fargo.  Other articles, reviews, and translations have appeared either online or in newsletters, local newspapers, interdisciplinary journals such as Ethnic and Racial Studies, Eurasia Studies Society Journal, Holocaust and Genocide Studies, Journal of Environmental Assessment Policy and Management, Journal of Genocide Research, Nationalities Papers, Oklahoma Politics, and Yearbook of the Society for German American Studies, as well as major international anthologies on the Holocaust by Berghahn Books and K. G. Saur Verlag.  In 2003, the GRHC NDSU Libraries in Fargo published his first monograph, An Expanded Bibliography and Reference Guide for the Former Soviet Union’s Germans: Issues of Ethnic Autonomy, Group Repression, Cultural Assimilation and Mass Emigration in the Twentieth Century and Beyond.  In addition to writing articles, he is currently working on three major book projects, two as editor and one as co-author. 
 

Schmaltz is co-executive director of the endowed Northwestern Oklahoma State University (NWOSU) Institute for Citizenship Studies.  He also serves as editor of GRHS Heritage Review, editorial board member of the AHSGR Journal of the American Historical Society of Germans from Russia, and member of the Board of Academic Advisors at the Center for Volga German Studies at Concordia University in Portland, Oregon.  Moreover, he is a member of the Society for German American Studies (SGAS) and the World History Association (WHA).

Review Board Members:

Dr. Richmond B. Adams - Assistant Professor of English, Northwestern Oklahoma State University (Alva)

Dr. Richmond B. Adams was awarded his Ph.D. in American literature from Southern Illinois University Carbondale in August 2011.  Throughout his academic life, his primary area of interest, passion, and specialization has centered on the period between the end of the Civil War and America’s entry into World War I in 1917.  He is particularly interested in the relationship between how Americans understood the idea of manners and the ways by which those expectations manifested themselves via cultural expressions of power.  Some of these expressions are overt, but what intrigues him are how these cultural relics appear in what might seem as ordinary means, such as furniture, clothing, and even the pattern of seating around a dinner table.  Within literature as well, he has concentrated on literary expressions of post-apocalyptic worlds in the aftermath of 9-11, such as ​​The Hunger Games​, and works by Cormac McCarthy.  


Dr. Don Betz - 20th President of the University of Central Oklahoma (Edmond, Oklahoma)

Dr. Don Betz is the former president of Northeastern State University in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. His experience in Oklahoma higher education spans more than three decades. From 1971 to 1994, he served Northeastern in various capacities, including Vice President for University Relations, Dean of Continuing Studies, Director of the Sequoyah Institute, Executive Director of the Educational Foundation, and Professor of Political Science. For five years, he held the positions of Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs at Palmer College of Chiropractic and Chief Academic Officer for the Palmer Chiropractic University System. In 1999, he took the post of Vice President for Academic Affairs and Professor of Political Science at the University of Central Oklahoma in Edmond, and was serving as Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs when he accepted the position at the University of Wisconsin-River Falls.

In 1982, Dr. Betz began his association with the United Nations as a consultant, and subsequently liaison officer, at the International Conference on the Question of Palestine. Two years later, he served as political affairs and liaison officer at the UN conference on the division for Palestinian rights.

Dr. Betz earned his Ph.D. degree in International Studies at the University of Denver in Colorado in May 1973, where he also graduated with a M.A. degree in 1969. He holds a B.A. degree in Political Science and Philosophy from the University of San Francisco in California. In addition, he has completed NDFL Summer Programs in Arabic language and culture at the University of California and New York University.

During his career, Dr. Betz has been the recipient of numerous awards and author of articles and papers on the topics of international affairs, higher education, and leadership. He has also presented extensively as a guest speaker and from 1984 to 2003. His work can be found as final declarations, statements, and communiqué throughout United Nations documents.


Dr. Michael Burlingame - Holder of Chancellor Naomi B. Lynn Distinguished Chair in Lincoln Studies, University of Illinois at Springfield

Professor Michael Burlingame was born in Washington, DC, and attended Phillips Academy, Andover. As a freshman at Princeton University, he took the Civil War course taught by the eminent Lincolnian David Herbert Donald, who took him under his wing and made him a research assistant. When Professor Donald moved on to Johns Hopkins University, Burlingame upon graduation from Princeton followed him to that institution. There he received his Ph.D. In 1968, he joined the History Department at Connecticut College in New London, where he taught until retiring in 2001 as the May Buckley Sadowski Professor of History Emeritus. He joined the faculty of the University of Illinois at Springfield in 2009.

Professor Burlingame is the author of Abraham Lincoln: A Life (2 vols.; Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2008) and The Inner World of Abraham Lincoln (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1994). In addition, he has edited the several volumes of Lincoln primary source materials: An Oral History of Abraham Lincoln: John G. Nicolay's Interviews and Essays (Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1996); Inside Lincoln’s White House: The Complete Civil War Diary of John Hay (Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1997), co-edited with John R. Turner Ettlinger; Lincoln Observed: Civil War Dispatches of Noah Brooks (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1998); Lincoln’s Journalist: John Hay’s Anonymous Writings for the Press, 1860-1864 (Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1998); A Reporter’s Lincoln by Walter B. Stevens (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1998); With Lincoln in the White House: Letters, Memoranda, and Other Writings of John G. Nicolay, 1860-1865 (Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 2000); At Lincoln’s Side: John Hay’s Civil War Correspondence and Selected Writings (Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 2000); Inside the White House in War Times: Memoirs and Reports of Lincoln’s Secretary by William O. Stoddard (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2000); Dispatches from Lincoln’s White House: The Anonymous Civil War Journalism of Presidential Secretary William O. Stoddard (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2002); The Real Lincoln: A Portrait by Jesse W. Weik (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2002); “Lincoln’s Humor” and Other Essays by Benjamin P. Thomas (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2002); and Abraham Lincoln: The Observations of John G. Nicolay and John Hay (Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 2007).

Professor Burlingame has received the Abraham Lincoln Association Book Prize (1996), the Lincoln Diploma of Honor from Lincoln Memorial University (1998), Honorable Mention for the Lincoln Prize, Gettysburg College (2001), and was inducted into the Lincoln Academy of Illinois in 2009.

Abraham Lincoln: A Life recently won the 2010 Lincoln Prize, sponsored by the Gilder-Lehrman Institute for American History and Gettysburg College, for the finest scholarly work in English on Abraham Lincoln, or the American Civil War soldier, or a subject relating to their era. It also was a co-winner of the annual book prize awarded by the Abraham Lincoln Institute of Washington, DC, and won the Russell P. Strange Book Award given annually by the Illinois State Historical Society for the best book on Illinois history.

Professor Burlingame currently lives in Springfield, where he is working on several Lincoln-related projects.


Dr. David Camacho - Special Assistant to the President and Associate Vice President for Diversity, Northern Arizona University (Flagstaff)

Dr. David E. Camacho received his B.A. degree in Political Science from Washington State University and M.A. and Ph.D. in Political Science at the University of Washington. His primary interests are in public policy and environmental politics. His research involves higher education policy. In his current position as Special Assistant to the President of Northern Arizona University (NAU) in Flagstaff, he is responsible for coordinating university-wide diversity and equity initiatives. As a member of the Arizona Minority Education Policy Analysis Center, he has a system-wide perspective on higher education policy. He served on the Arizona Board of Regents as President of the Arizona Faculties Council, and as President of NAU’s Faculty Senate became knowledgeable in governance issues.

Dr. Camacho is currently working on the second edition of Environmental Injustices, Political Struggles and has published in the areas of environmental politics, social movement theory, democratic theory, urban politics, political socialization, and Latina/o politics. At the undergraduate level, he teaches Race, Power and Politics, Environmental Politics and Policy, Urban Politics, and U.S. Government and Politics. At the graduate level, he teaches Public Organizational Theory, Race Theory, and Elements of Public Administration.


Dr. Mario Carvajal H., Emeritus - University of Costa Rica (San Pedro) and Former Costa Rican Ambassador to the European Union

Dr. Mario Carvajal was Professor of Political Science/Public Administration (retired) at the University of Costa Rica. His extensive involvement at the highest levels of the Costa Rican government provides a unique perspective of the realities of the process. The experience of Dr. Carvajal during the 1990s as Minister of Agriculture and Minister of Public Sector Reform illustrate many of the problems and benefits which have resulted from the International Monetary Fund in his country.

In the public sector, Dr. Carvajal has held positions as Ambassador of Costa Rica to the European Union, Minister of State Transformation, Minister of Agriculture and Livestock Raising, Director of the National Park Foundation (1992-1994), National Legislator and Chair of Several Commissions, Minister of Exports and Investment, Presidential Advisor Minister in Cooperative Development, General Manager of the National Production Council, and Vice Minister of Economy, Industry and Trade.


Dr. W. Douglas Catterall - Cameron University (Lawton, Oklahoma)

Dr. Douglas Catterall is an early modern European historian whose research focuses on the cultural impact of migration on community and societal identities, and he has written in book- and article-format on the role of ethnicity, corporate groups, and portable forms of community in mercantile and religious diasporas as well as the place of social memory and networks in group and everyday civic identity in pre-modern Europe and the Atlantic world. His current book-length projects concern women in Atlantic world ports and the contributions of networks to diaspora dynamics. He has held grants from or attended advanced seminars sponsored by the American/Scandinavian Foundation, the Fulbright Commission, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Oklahoma Humanities Council, and has sponsored a range of academic outreach initiatives to engage with members of the public covering topics such as comparative heartlands, race and ethnicity, and alternative energy. He is associate professor of history at Cameron University, where he has been on the faculty in the Department of History and Government since 2000, and his teaching fields include the social and cultural history of early modern Europe and the Atlantic world, world history, and comparative history.


Dr. Jessica Clark - Western Wyoming Community College (Rock Springs)

Dr. Jessica Clark joined the Social Science and Fine Arts Division at Western Wyoming Community College as an Assistant Professor of History and Political Science in 2012.  Two years before, she earned her doctorate in history from North Dakota State University (NDSU). Her dissertation examines the identity reconstruction of Germans from Russia on the Northern Plains through oral histories. She is a trained oral historian who specializes in rural history and childhood, family, and gender studies. Currently, Clark is researching the reconstruction of a tragedy (the Cokeville Elementary School Bombing of 1986) as a miracle narrative.

In any given year, Clark presents at two or three conferences, including the conferences/meetings for the Organization of American Historians, Oral History Association, and Western Social Science Association. In 2010, she co-published “The Germans from Russia in Saskatchewan: An Oral History” in the American Review of Canadian Studies with Dr. Tom Isern. Clark also has solo peer-reviewed publications in The Journal of Family History, The Historian, and Journal of History of Childhood and Youth.


Dr. John K. Cox - Head of the Department of History, Philosophy and Religion, North Dakota State University (Fargo)

John K. Cox received his undergraduate degree from Guilford College in Greensboro, NC, and his doctorate from Indiana University in Bloomington. Cox is the author of The History of Serbia and Slovenia: Evolving Loyalties. He has published translations of novels by Danilo Kis and Ivan Cankar and of essays and stories by a wide range of Central European and Balkan writers.  He is currently writing a study of the fiction of the Albanian intellectual Ismail Kadare, as well as a history of modern Croatia. Cox taught European history for 13 years at Wheeling Jesuit University near Pittsburgh.


Dr. Shawn Holliday - Associate Dean of Graduate Studies, Northwestern Oklahoma State University (Alva)

Dr. Shawn Holliday served as an Associate Professor of English and Chair of the English, Foreign Language, and Humanities Department at Northwestern prior to working in Graduate Studies.

He received his M.A. degree from Marshall University in 1993 and his Ph.D. from Indiana University of Pennsylvania in 1999. His areas of specialization include American Realism and Naturalism, Modernism (American and British), and Literary Criticism, especially New Historicism. He is also interested in Asian American literature, Western American literature, and Appalachian literature.

Dr. Holliday is the author of two books, Thomas Wolfe and the Politics of Modernism, published by Peter Lang in 2001, and Lawson Fusao Inada, published by Boise State University’s Western Writers Series in 2003. His articles have appeared in a wide variety of journals and reference books, including Notes on Modern Irish Literature, Appalachian Heritage, The South Carolina Review, and The Encyclopedia of Appalachia. From 2006 to 2008, Dr. Holliday served as the President of the Thomas Wolfe Society. For the past eight years, he has also worked as a Consulting Editor for The Thomas Wolfe Review.

Dr. Holliday’s awards and prizes include the Everett T. Helm Fellowship (to support research using the Clifford Odets papers at Indiana University’s Lilly Library), the Zelda and Paul Gitlin Literary Prize (for the best article published on Thomas Wolfe in 2006), and the William B. Wisdom Grant in Aid of Research (to support research using the Thomas Wolfe papers at Harvard University’s Houghton Library). In 2003, he was appointed a fellow to the Salzburg Seminar session in Contemporary American Literature, and, in 2005, he was appointed to Who’s Who Among America’s Teachers.


Dr. Thomas D. Isern - University Distinguished Professor and Director of the Center for Heritage Renewal, North Dakota State University (Fargo)

Thomas D. (Tom) Isern is Professor of History at North Dakota State University, Fargo, North Dakota. Born and raised on a wheat farm in western Kansas, he has lived all his life on the plains of Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas, Nebraska, Saskatchewan, and North Dakota (except when abroad, studying the grasslands of New Zealand and Australia).

Isern holds a B.A. degree from Bethany College, Lindsborg, Kansas, as well as M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma. Prior to coming to NDSU in 1992, Isern served eleven years on the faculty of Emporia State University, Kansas.

Isern’s academic specialty is the history and folklore of the Great Plains of North America, his research and teaching comprising both the American plains and the Canadian prairies. He is the author or co-author of six books, including, most recently, Dakota Circle: Excursions on the True Plains, published by the NDSU Institute for Regional Studies. His particular interest is the story of farming, ranching, and rural life on the plains. He explores this interest in frequent lectures and concerts for public and professional audiences throughout the region. He also writes about it (co-authorship with Jim Hoy) in the weekly (since 1983) newspaper column, Plains Folk, also heard weekly on the statewide public radio service of Prairie Public.

In 1991, as a Fulbright Scholar, Isern investigated the agricultural history of the tussock grasslands of New Zealand; in 1996, he returned for further work in New Zealand under a Programme Development Grant from the NZ-US Educational Foundation; and he returns there frequently to continue a line of research in agricultural and environmental history.

“The Great Plains from Texas to Saskatchewan: Place, Memory, Identity” is a National Endowment for the Humanities seminar for school teachers Isern has led in the summers of 2000, 2002, 2004, 2006, and 2008. This intensive study experience for master teachers from across the U.S. examines the culture of the plains through the works of Walter P. Webb, Willa Cather, N. Scott Momaday, and Wallace Stegner.

At the 22nd Governor’s Conference on North Dakota History held in Bismarck, he also received the North Dakota 2010 Heritage Honor Profile Award from the State Historical Society of North Dakota. The Heritage Profile Honor Award is given in recognition of those individuals who have made a lasting or significant contribution in preserving, interpreting, promoting, researching, or otherwise extending the knowledge and understanding of the history of North Dakota.

Isern is the founding director of NDSU’s Center for Heritage Renewal, an applied research and service center devoted to historic preservation and heritage tourism on the northern plains.

At NDSU Isern has received the Peltier Award for Innovative Teaching and been named both the Fargo Chamber of Commerce Distinguished Professor as well as the Dale Hogoboom Presidential Professor. In 2007, President Chapman conferred on Isern the title of University Distinguished Professor, one of the first seven such appointments campus-wide.

Isern is committed to communication and engagement with the regional public. He devotes his research to regional issues; teaches resident and extramural courses dealing with regional history and folklore; serves as an officer and volunteer for state and local organizations; and most of all, speaks and writes for the general public, not only for the academic community. These things flow from his personal affection for the land and people of the North American plains and from his professional devotion to the quality of regional life.


Dr. Thomas H. Little - Director of Curriculum Development and Research, State Legislative Leaders Foundation (Greensboro, North Carolina)

Dr. Thom Little has coordinated and participated in numerous educational and training programs for state legislative leaders and advocacy groups over the last ten years. He has made presentations on effective advocacy for the National Education Association (June, 2000), at a conference sponsored by the National Center for Children in Poverty, the Institute for Child and Family Policy and the Chapin Hall Center for Children (2003), The South Carolina New Statesmen Society (2005 and 2007), the Democratic Caucus of the North Carolina House of Representatives (2004). The NC Institute of Political Leadership (2008) and the Leadership Team of the New Hampshire House of Representative (2009). In addition to his work with SLLF, he is a Lecturer at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro where he teaches courses in state government, American politics, leadership and elections.

Little earned his Doctorate from The Ohio State University in 1991 and taught at the University of Texas at Arlington from 1992 to 1999, after three years at American University in Washington, DC. His areas of teaching and research specialization include state politics, legislative politics, political parties, term limits, Congress and state legislative leadership. Dr. Little has published more than a dozen articles on these topics in a variety of academic journals and has published seven book chapters on the attitudes and activities of state legislative leaders. Dr. Little has served as a consultant for the Leadership Development Program of the Federal Judicial Center in Washington, DC since 1991. He is also a member of the Selection Committee for the William M. Bulger Excellence in Leadership Award and is active in several political science associations, having chaired numerous panels and discussion sessions in those organizations. He is also advisor and faculty for the Institute of Political Leadership.

As the Director of Research and Curriculum for the State Legislative Leaders Foundation, Dr. Little has worked closely in the writing and production of several publications including, State Legislative Leaders: Keys to Effective Legislation for Children and Families, Welfare Reform and the Advocacy Community: Opportunities Missed, Opportunities on the Horizon, What Have You Gotten Yourself Into? A Guide for New Legislative Leaders, and several case studies about legislative leadership. He is also the co-author of The Legislative Branch of State Government: People, Processes and Politics (ABC-CLIO, 2006).

Dr. Little and his wife, Dr. Catherine Scott-Little, reside in Greensboro, North Carolina with their two daughters, Virginia (13) and Rebecca (10) where they are active in church. Dr. Little serves as Chairman of the Board of Directors of the Greensboro Ballet, on the UNCG Baptist Student Union Alumni Association and assistant coach to his daughter’s Upward Basketball team.


Dr. Justin Quinn Olmstead - Assistant Professor of History, University of Central Oklahoma (Edmond, Oklahoma)

Dr. Justin Quinn Olmstead earned a Ph.D. in history from the University of Sheffield in England, an M.A. degree in American History from Emporia State University in Emporia, KS, a B.A. degree in history from Southwestern College in Winfield, KS, and a B.A. degree in political science from Washburn University in Topeka, KS.  He taught for several years in the public schools in Winfield, KS, and as an adjunct instructor at Southwestern College.  In 2013-2014, he taught at Northwestern Oklahoma State University (NWOSU).  Since 2014, he has been teaching in the Department of History at the University of Central Oklahoma (UCO) in Edmond.  His research interests include World War I and Diplomatic, American and European History.


Dr. Jennifer Page - Assistant Professor of English, Northwestern Oklahoma State University (Alva)

Dr. Jennifer Page joined Northwestern Oklahoma State University’s English, Foreign Language, and Humanities Department in Fall 2014.  She teaches courses in early British literature, literary theory, and composition.  Her research interests include English Renaissance drama, gender and sexuality studies, historical masculinity, Internet culture, zombie films and literature, and the novels of Chuck Palahniuk.  On a personal level, Dr. Page enjoys volunteering with many local and university organizations.  She believes that the most tangible way to demonstrate good citizenship is to become an active community member through volunteering, philanthropy, and charitable donations.  


Dr. J. Otto Pohl - Lecturer in the Department of History at the University of Ghana (Legon)

Dr. J. Otto Pohl teaches Modern European and World History. From 2008 to 2010, he served as an associate professor of International and Comparative Politics at American University of Central Asia in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan. He earned a B.A. (1992) in History from Grinnell College in Grinnell, Iowa, and an M.A. (2002) and Ph.D. (2004) in History from the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, United Kingdom. He is the author of two books, The Stalinist Penal System (Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 1997) and Ethnic Cleansing in the USSR, 1937–1949 (Westport, CT: Greenwood, 1999). He has also written a number of shorter pieces on the subject of national deportations in the USSR. Among the journals that have featured his work are Human Rights Review, Journal of Genocide Research and Journal of Interdisciplinary History.


Dr. Joachim "Yogi" Reppmann - Newspaper Journalist, Historian, Consultant (Northfield, Minnesota and Flensburg, Germany)

Dr. Joachim “Yogi” Reppmann was born in Flensburg, Schleswig-Holstein, in 1957. He attended the Altes Gymnasium, a school founded by Danish King Frederick II in 1566. He matriculated at the University of Kiel, where he studied history, American literature, and philosophy. In 1984, he completed his master’s thesis entitled “Transplanted Ideas: The Concept of Freedom and Democracy of the Schleswig-Holstein Forty-Eighters--Origins and Effects, 1846-1856.” He has written several books on notable Schleswig-Holstein emigrants and the mass migration to the United States; served as a professor of German at St. Olaf and Carleton Colleges in Northfield, Minnesota; and chaired several conferences on topics ranging from the Low German language to Forty-Eighter Hans Reimer Claussen.

Since 1983, Yogi has organized both individualized language study-abroad programs and educational exchanges between the United States and Germany for groups as diverse as farmers from Holstein, Iowa; American teachers of German language; college football players; and representatives of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota.


Dr. LaVern J. Rippley - Saint Olaf College (Northfield, Minnesota)

Dr. LaVern J. Rippley’s paternal ancestors immigrated with the name Rieple from Unadingen near Donaueschingen in Baden, Germany, around 1855 and settled in Buffalo County, Wisconsin, near the small community of Waumandee. Today, the county remains largely German and Swiss. His maternal grandparents arrived in 1882 with the name Rucinski (sometimes Rudschinske) from the Silesian towns of Schubin and Lachowo near Bromberg in Posen Germany and settled in the Trempealeau county Polish-speaking community between Arcadia and Independence. Born at Waumandee in 1935, Rippley took a B.A. in Wisconsin, an M.A. at Kent State and the Ph.D. at the Ohio State University in 1965, following study also as a Fulbright Fellow at the University of Munich. He taught high school for two years at River Falls, WI, three years at Ohio Wesleyan in Delaware before beginning a professorship at St. Olaf College in Northfield, MN, since 1967. Details are available in his family history Noble Women, Restless Menand at http://www.stolaf.edu/depts/german/faculty/rippley.html. Rippley is the author of over 200 articles and 17 books, the latest of which is The Chemnitzer Concertina: A History and an Accolade (2006).

Dr. Rippley’s teaching areas include German Romanticism, the Novelle, Survey of German Literature in Translation, seminars on the German Revolutions of 1848, Germany during the Hitler Period, German Regionalism, the German Bauhaus, Germanic Folklore, Stoff-Motif-und Symbolforschung, Urbanization (Material Culture and the Common Landscape in the Paracollege) Berlin Seminar, Freshman Writing courses, Summer Seminar for Teachers of German, the German-Americans, the German Economy, Seminars in 1991 and 1992 on the unification of the economies of East and West Germany done on-site in Paderborn (Westphalia) and Dresden (Saxony) regions. He has also led student study tours to the Hanseatic region of Mare Balticum (Germany, Poland, Russia, Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia, Finland, and Sweden in 1997, 1999, 2001, 2003, 2005, and 2007) as well as adult groups to the concertina region around Chemnitz, Germany.


Tim Rives - Deputy Director of the Dwight D. Eisenhower Presidential Library and Museum (Abilene, Kansas)

Timothy D. Rives received his Bachelor of General Studies from Wichita State University and a Master of Arts in American History from Emporia State University. Prior to becoming the Deputy Director and Supervisory Archivist of the Eisenhower Presidential Library, he served as a reference and research archivist with the National Archives at Kansas City, where he specialized in federal prison records. His research interests include the presidency and baseball history. In 2002, he received the Robert Peterson Recognition Award from the Society for American Baseball Research for Biographical Research.

His publications include: “Grant, Babcock, and the Whiskey Ring,” Prologue, Vol. 32 No. 3 (Fall 2000); “Tom Baird: A Challenge to the Modern Memory of the Kansas City Monarchs” in Satchel Paige and Company: Essays on the Kansas City Monarchs, Their Greatest Star, and the Negro Leagues, ed. Leslie Heaphy (Jefferson, NC: McFarland Publishing Company, 2007); “Introducing Archives and Archivists to Teachers (and Vice Versa)” in Teaching American History: Lessons for History Educators and Historians, eds. Rachel Ragland and Kelly Woestman (New York: Routledge, 2009).

Rives served in the US Army from 1987 to 1992.


Dr. Samuel W. Rushay, Jr. - Supervisor of the Archives of the Harry S. Truman Library and Museum (Independence, Missouri)

Samuel W. Rushay, Jr., is supervisory archivist at the Harry S. Truman Library and Museum in Independence, Missouri, where he worked as an archivist from 1993 to 1997. From 1997 to 2007, he was an archivist and subject matter expert at the Nixon Presidential Materials Staff at the National Archives in College Park, Maryland.

Sam published “Listening to Nixon: An Archivist’s Reflections on his Work with the White House Tapes” in the fall 2007 issue of the National Archives and Records Administration’s Prologue magazine. He is the author of “Harry Truman’s History Lessons,” which appeared in the spring 2009 issue of Prologue. He also published “Harry Truman’s Masonic Career as Revealed in the Truman Library’s Collections,” in the summer 2009 issue of The Missouri Freemason. He contributed “A Graphic Essay Based on the Holdings of the Harry S. Truman Library,” in Native Americans and the Legacy of Harry S. Truman, Volume 4 (Kirksville, MO: Truman State University, 2010).

A Columbus, Ohio native, Sam holds a doctorate in U.S. history from Ohio University, where he wrote his dissertation, “The Farm Fair Dealer: Charles F. Brannan and American Liberalism” (2000), under the direction of Truman biographer Alonzo Hamby.

Sam, his wife, Laura, and their two children live in Liberty, Missouri.


Dr. Neta Steinberg - Ort Kiryat Bialik College (Kiryat Bialik, Israel)

Dr. Neta Steinberg teaches history at Ort Kiryat Bialik College in Kiryat Bialik, Israel.  For nearly ten years she was a teaching fellow at the Department of General History at Haifa University, Israel. She teaches modern Russian history, but her main interest is education, religion and everyday life in the German Colonies in Russia until the First World War. Her doctoral thesis “The Education of German Colonists in South Russia 1764–1914” (in Hebrew) concerned the evolution of the education system in these colonies (Haifa University, 2000).

Some of her recent publications include “Hoffnungstal and the Separatist Congregations in South Russia,” in Religious Radicalism, ed. Meir Litvak and Ora Limor [in Hebrew] (Jerusalem: Zalman Shazar Center for Jewish History, 2007), pp. 267–300; and “From One Generation to the Next: Teachers and Teaching in the German Colonies in South Russia, 1804–1914,” Paedagogica Historica, 45:3 (June 2009): pp. 329–353.


Dr. Tony Wohlers - Director of Academic Enrichment, Cameron University (Lawton, Oklahoma)

Dr. Tony Wohlers has received BAs in History and Political Science from the University of the Saarland (Germany), a BA in Political Science from Sonoma State University, an MA in Political Science from the University of Illinois, and a Ph.D. in Political Science from Northern Illinois University.  He is currently an associate professor of political science at Cameron University, teaching and researching in the areas of public policy, public administration, and research methods.  For several years, he also served as Cameron’s Academic Research Director.  In mid-2012, he assumed a full-time administrative position at Cameron as the Director of Academic Enrichment.  In that capacity, he is responsible for internal and external grants as well as the honors program.  He has published in the areas of civic associations in local government, local electronic government in the United States and Germany, and biopolitics in North America and the European Union.


Dr. John Wood - Assistant Professor of Political Science, University of Central Oklahoma (Edmond, Oklahoma)

Dr. John Wood earned his Doctorate in Environmental Policy and Conflict Management from Oklahoma State University in January 2007. He has a master’s degree in political science and a baccalaureate degree in journalism from OSU as well. He formerly served as Faculty Senate President. He also serves as faculty advisor for the Rose State’s Vocal Oklahomans in Civic Engagement (VOICE), Veteran’s Club, and the Go Green Club.

Other professional achievements include: the Oklahoma Political Science Professor of the Year Award in 2007 for community colleges from the Oklahoma Political Science Association (OPSA) and the NISOD award for teaching excellence in 2008-2009. Professor Wood’s book Taking Sides: Controversial Issues in State & Local Government published in 2010. His peer-reviewed work includes topics such as social movement studies, civic engagement, environmental policy, conflict management, ethics and good government.

Dr. Wood also sits on the Guthrie City Council, representing Ward I. With the Guthrie Transportation Authority, he co-founded the First Capitol Neighborhood Solutions. He is also a Gulf War vet with the USMC.

Assistant Review Board Members (Department of Social Sciences, Northwestern Oklahoma State University, Alva):

Jana Brown

Jana Brown serves as an Instructor in History and also as the Coordinator of Social Sciences Education.  She holds a B.A. in Social Science Education and a M.A. degree in American Studies, both of which she earned at Northwestern Oklahoma State University (NWOSU).  Before teaching at NWOSU, she taught high school for several years at Enid, Fort Supply and Cherokee, Oklahoma.  She also has a background in museum work.  Her interests include the history of Oklahoma, the Great Plains, and African-Americans in the West.  


Dr. Kay Decker - Chair of the Department of Social Sciences

Dr. Kay Decker is Chair of the Social Sciences Department and Professor of Sociology at Northwestern Oklahoma State University (NWOSU). She earned a B.A.Ed. in Social Science Education from Northwestern Oklahoma State University, an M.S. in Sociology from Oklahoma State University, and an Ed.D. in Occupational and Adult Education from Oklahoma State University.

Dr. Decker has served as a NWOSU faculty member since 1991. Prior to joining the faculty at NWOSU, she served as Program Coordinator and Caseworker for Northwest Oklahoma Eldercare which covered three counties in northwest Oklahoma. She is also Executive Director of Freedom West Community Development Corporation, a 501(c)(3) non-profit development entity serving five counties in northwest Oklahoma.

Dr. Decker’s areas of specialization include Racial and Ethnic Studies/Social Diversity, Anthropology and American Indians of the Southwest, Social Gerontology, Social Theory and Research Methods, Rural Sociology, and Community Development. Her research and writing covers Rural Community Development, Grant Writing and Program Management, Strategic Planning and Asset Mapping, Cultural Heritage and Historic Preservation. She has written and received grants for community development and affordable housing programs in excess of $6.2 million over the past decade from federal, state, and regional funders as well as the private philanthropic sector.

Dr. Decker is President of the Board of Directors of Preservation Oklahoma (statewide historic preservation non-profit), Vice President of the Board of Directors of the Cherokee Strip Museum Association, Chair of the Board of Directors of Woods County Economic Development Committee, and past President of the Oklahoma Sociology Association.


Dr. Deena Fisher - Dean, Woodward Campus

Dr. Deena Fisher is the Dean of the Woodward Campus (Northwestern Oklahoma State University). Her responsibilities include teaching, counseling, advising and administration. Born in Elk City, she earned an M.Ed. in both Social Science and School Counseling (Southwestern Oklahoma State University). She holds an Ed. D. in Higher Education Administration (Oklahoma State University) and attended the “Institute for Management and Leadership in Higher Education” (Harvard). Her positions included Professor of History, Department Chairperson and Upward Bound Counselor.

Deena believes in servant leadership and active community involvement. She serves on several boards including Oklahoma Commission on the Status of Women (Governor Appointee), Oklahoma Historical Society, Cherokee Strip Regional Heritage Museum, Plains Indians and Pioneer Museum, Rotary, Woodward Chamber of Commerce, William S. Key Correctional Citizen Advisory Board, Council of Oklahoma Extended Campus Administrators, Psi Chapter Delta Kappa Gamma, Woodward United Fund, and Woodward Industrial Foundation.

Deena’s accomplishments include 2010 Woodward Citizen of the Year, 2008 Women’s Summit Chairperson (OCSW) and Women’s Foundation of Oklahoma Advisory Board Member (2010). She is a contributing author of an Oklahoma History Textbook and coordinates an Oklahoma History Summer Institute that celebrates local history.

Deena has four grandchildren. She enjoys visiting historical sites, museums and Presidential Libraries.


Dr. Roger Hardaway

Dr. Roger Hardaway is a Professor of History at Northwestern Oklahoma State University (NWOSU) in Alva. He started his career at NWOSU in 1990. He earned undergraduate degrees in History and Political Science. After earning a master’s degree in History, he completed a J.D. degree at Memphis State University (Law) in Tennessee and a D.A. in History at the University of North Dakota in Grand Forks. Over the years, he has presented at numerous conferences and published widely in newspapers and journals. He also stands as a recognized scholar on the history of African Americans in the West, including the book (co-authored with Monroe Lee Billington) African Americans on the Western Frontier (1998). 


Ken Kelsey

Ken Kelsey is an Instructor in the Departments of History at Northwestern Oklahoma State University. He has been teaching “Art in Life” since the fall of 2005, as well as a variety of History courses, including a series on Historic Preservation.

Mr. Kelsey holds both a B.A. and M.A. in History from Oklahoma State University and a M.A. in Art History from the University of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. Before moving back to his home state of Oklahoma, he worked for ten years in the Education Department of the Dallas Museum of Art, eventually as the Manager of Teaching Programs where he prepared docents and area educators to teach in the museum.

In addition to his work at NWOSU, Mr. Kelsey teaches courses at Northern Oklahoma College and the Lifelong Learning Institute, both in Enid. He is a former National Art Education Association, Museum Division “Educator of the Year” and a current board member of Preservation Oklahoma. He also does back-stage work at Enid’s Gaslight Theatre and continues his vineyard work at Longwood Farm west of Ringwood.


Jeff McAlpin

Jeff McAlpin holds B.S. and M.B.S. degrees from Northwestern Oklahoma State University (NWOSU) and has done additional graduate study at Oklahoma State University in Stillwater. He is an Instructor of Sociology/Criminal Justice at NWOSU’s Department of Social Sciences. In addition to his teaching duties, he serves as the Treatment Director of the C.E. “Bill” Johnson Correctional Center in Alva, OK. He also spent a number of years serving in the NWOSU Faculty Senate.


J.W. Platt, Emeritus

J.W. Platt graduated with a B.A. in History from Northwestern Oklahoma State University and then earned his M.A. in History at the University of Kansas in Lawrence. He spent about eight years in Central America. First, he worked on a Fulbright Research Grant in Guatemala, and then he was a cattle rancher in Costa Rica. After he returned to the United States, he continued to travel in Latin America as an exporter of agricultural equipment, before settling back home in southern Kansas as a farmer-rancher. In 1999, he began adjunct teaching in History at Northwestern Oklahoma State University. In 2003, he was hired as full-time faculty, retiring in 2014. 


Donovan Reichenberger, Emeritus

Donovan Reichenberger of Alva, OK, is a veteran of World War II and the Korean War. After a career in the U. S. Navy, he earned his bachelor’s degree from Northwestern in 1966 and a master’s degree from Wichita State in 1967. He joined the Northwestern faculty in 1967.

Reichenberger is a member of the Tyler Trust Board. He has also served on the Share Medical Center Board of Trustees, Alva Centennial Commission and as chairman and member of various Northwestern faculty committees.


Kirk Rogers

Kirk Rogers holds a B.S. degree in Law Enforcement from Northwestern Oklahoma State University (NWOSU) and an M.A. degree in Criminal Justice from Wichita State University in Kansas. He teaches Criminal Justice at NWOSU’s Department of Social Sciences. His areas of specialization include Narcotics Investigation, Criminal Investigation, Police Administration, Corrections, Patrol Operations, Civil Process Service, Evidence Collection, Intelligence Gathering, Covert Operations, Surveillance Operations, Report Writing, Drafting Affidavits, Drafting Search Warrants, Courtroom Testimony, and the Court System. He is also a Lifetime Member of the Association of Oklahoma Narcotic Enforcers and a student organizations sponsor for COPPS Club.

Advisory Board Members:

Dr. Mario Carvajal H., Emeritus - University of Costa Rica (San Pedro) and Former Costa Rican Ambassador to the European Union

Dr. Mario Carvajal was Professor of Political Science/Public Administration (retired) at the University of Costa Rica. His extensive involvement at the highest levels of the Costa Rican government provides a unique perspective of the realities of the process. The experience of Dr. Carvajal during the 1990s as Minister of Agriculture and Minister of Public Sector Reform illustrate many of the problems and benefits which have resulted from the International Monetary Fund in his country.

In the public sector, Dr. Carvajal has held positions as Ambassador of Costa Rica to the European Union, Minister of State Transformation, Minister of Agriculture and Livestock Raising, Director of the National Park Foundation (1992-1994), National Legislator and Chair of Several Commissions, Minister of Exports and Investment, Presidential Advisor Minister in Cooperative Development, General Manager of the National Production Council, and Vice Minister of Economy, Industry and Trade.


Dr. Kay Decker - Chair of the Department of Social Sciences, Northwestern Oklahoma State University (Alva)

Dr. Kay Decker is Chair of the Social Sciences Department and Professor of Sociology at Northwestern Oklahoma State University (NWOSU). She earned a B.A.Ed. in Social Science Education from Northwestern Oklahoma State University, an M.S. in Sociology from Oklahoma State University, and an Ed.D. in Occupational and Adult Education from Oklahoma State University.

Dr. Decker has served as a NWOSU faculty member since 1991. Prior to joining the faculty at NWOSU, she served as Program Coordinator and Caseworker for Northwest Oklahoma Eldercare which covered three counties in northwest Oklahoma. She is also Executive Director of Freedom West Community Development Corporation, a 501(c)(3) non-profit development entity serving five counties in northwest Oklahoma.

Dr. Decker’s areas of specialization include Racial and Ethnic Studies/Social Diversity, Anthropology and American Indians of the Southwest, Social Gerontology, Social Theory and Research Methods, Rural Sociology, and Community Development. Her research and writing covers Rural Community Development, Grant Writing and Program Management, Strategic Planning and Asset Mapping, Cultural Heritage and Historic Preservation. She has written and received grants for community development and affordable housing programs in excess of $6.2 million over the past decade from federal, state, and regional funders as well as the private philanthropic sector.

Dr. Decker is President of the Board of Directors of Preservation Oklahoma (statewide historic preservation non-profit), Vice President of the Board of Directors of the Cherokee Strip Museum Association, Chair of the Board of Directors of Woods County Economic Development Committee, and past President of the Oklahoma Sociology Association.


Dr. Aaron Mason, Professor of Political Science, Northwestern Oklahoma State University

Dr. Aaron Mason holds a B.A. from Northeastern State University in Tahlequah, Oklahoma, an M.A. from the University of Texas at Arlington, and a Ph.D. from Northern Arizona University in Flagstaff. His research interests include American Politics, the U.S. Constitution, the Founding Fathers and the American Civil War. He has made academic presentations at Oklahoma Research Day, the Western Social Science Association, the Arkansas Political Science Association, and many others. Active in the Oklahoma Political Science Association, he has published articles and papers for Oklahoma Politics and Kendall Hunt. He has held jobs in the public and private sectors is proud of co-ordinating the annual Constitution Day observances held at NWOSU each September. He lives in Alva with his wife DeeAnn and their two children, Hannah and Morgan.


J.W. Platt, Emeritus

J.W. Platt graduated with a B.A. in History from Northwestern Oklahoma State University and then earned his M.A. in History at the University of Kansas in Lawrence. He spent about eight years in Central America. First, he worked on a Fulbright Research Grant in Guatemala, and then he was a cattle rancher in Costa Rica. After he returned to the United States, he continued to travel in Latin America as an exporter of agricultural equipment, before settling back home in southern Kansas as a farmer-rancher. In 1999, he began adjunct teaching in History at Northwestern Oklahoma State University. In 2003, he was hired as full-time faculty, retiring in 2014. 


Dr. Eric J. Schmaltz, Professor of History, Northwestern Oklahoma State University

Dr. Eric J. Schmaltz teaches Modern European and World History. Both sides of his family claim some Black Sea German ancestry, and their odyssey across half the globe influenced him to pursue the history profession.  Though born in North Dakota, he has lived in several states over the years (in some of them more than once), including Maryland, Arizona, Nebraska, Iowa, and Minnesota as well as time abroad as an exchange student at the University of Paderborn in Germany.  He earned a B.A. (1994) in History and German Language with honors at Saint Olaf College in Northfield, Minnesota.  Following his M.A. (1996) in History at the University of North Dakota in Grand Forks, he completed a Ph.D. (2002) in History at the University of Nebraska in Lincoln.  He specializes in Modern Germany and Modern Russia with an emphasis on ethnic and nationality studies, particularly German minorities in Russia and the former USSR.  He has also recently taken a greater interest in topics concerning Diasporas and transnationalism.

Despite significant teaching commitments, Schmaltz speaks at numerous conferences and public events.  He has also produced a variety of articles and German- and Russian-language translations for publication in the American Historical Society of Germans from Russia (AHSGR) in Lincoln, Nebraska, the Germans from Russia Heritage Society (GRHS) in Bismarck, North Dakota, and the Germans from Russia Heritage Collection at the North Dakota State University (GRHC NDSU) Libraries in Fargo.  Other articles, reviews, and translations have appeared either online or in newsletters, local newspapers, interdisciplinary journals such as Ethnic and Racial Studies, Eurasia Studies Society Journal, Holocaust and Genocide Studies, Journal of Environmental Assessment Policy and Management, Journal of Genocide Research, Nationalities Papers, Oklahoma Politics, and Yearbook of the Society for German American Studies, as well as major international anthologies on the Holocaust by Berghahn Books and K. G. Saur Verlag.  In 2003, the GRHC NDSU Libraries in Fargo published his first monograph, An Expanded Bibliography and Reference Guide for the Former Soviet Union’s Germans: Issues of Ethnic Autonomy, Group Repression, Cultural Assimilation and Mass Emigration in the Twentieth Century and Beyond.  In addition to writing articles, he is currently working on three major book projects, two as editor and one as co-author. 
 

Schmaltz is co-executive director of the endowed Northwestern Oklahoma State University (NWOSU) Institute for Citizenship Studies.  He also serves as editor of GRHS Heritage Review, editorial board member of the AHSGR Journal of the American Historical Society of Germans from Russia, and member of the Board of Academic Advisors at the Center for Volga German Studies at Concordia University in Portland, Oregon.  Moreover, he is a member of the Society for German American Studies (SGAS) and the World History Association (WHA).


Dr. Tony Wohlers - Director of Academic Enrichment, Cameron University (Lawton, Oklahoma)

Dr. Tony Wohlers has received BAs in History and Political Science from the University of the Saarland (Germany), a BA in Political Science from Sonoma State University, an MA in Political Science from the University of Illinois, and a Ph.D. in Political Science from Northern Illinois University.  He is currently an associate professor of political science at Cameron University, teaching and researching in the areas of public policy, public administration, and research methods.  For several years, he also served as Cameron’s Academic Research Director.  In mid-2012, he assumed a full-time administrative position at Cameron as the Director of Academic Enrichment.  In that capacity, he is responsible for internal and external grants as well as the honors program.  He has published in the areas of civic associations in local government, local electronic government in the United States and Germany, and biopolitics in North America and the European Union.

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