Employee - Larry Justice | Northwestern Oklahoma State University

Employee - Larry Justice

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Employee - Larry Justice

Larry JusticeLarry Justice
Adjunct instructor of Philosophy, Ethics and Communication
1969 – Bachelor of Arts from Hardin-Simmons University in Abilene, Texas
1972 – MDiv from Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary
1983 – Master’s of Art in Communication from Southwestern Seminary

“The invitation is simple: Become a Ranger and have a major impact upon the world.”

“My favorite things about Northwestern are two-fold. First, after 30 years at Northwestern, the physical changes being made to our campus facilities and landscape already are impacting the rest of the state,” Justice said.

Second, my life is much, much richer because of the friends I have at Northwestern. Northwestern is a special place. Northwestern is a significant place. We are not perfect – but we certainly have a lot going for us.

About Larry: My wife Debby and I have been married for 35 years. Debby is a first grade teacher in the Alva school system. We are active members of First Baptist Church. We have two sons. Our oldest son Christopher and his wife Liz are the parents of our three granddaughters. Our youngest son Shane and his wife Tabitha are new parents to twins.

My hobbies include golf and studying Oklahoma history. I am a member of the Oklahoma and Kansas Historical Societies and the Santa Fe Trail Association. I thoroughly enjoy baseball and OU football and watching the Rangers in any sport.

Share something about yourself that not many people know about you. Something that shows another side to your “professor” personality.
A: One principle success story involves the “Oklahoma Flag Project” I helped develop as a part of the Oklahoma Centennial celebration and the noting of Northwestern’s 110th anniversary. At first, our goal was to “sell” 20 sponsorships. We ended up with 53 sponsorships. That meant that 53 people made a $50 investment in celebrating our centennial and anniversary. But, more significantly, it meant that many students and members of the Northwestern family participated in displaying the flags across our campus. Likewise, in 2008, we had 19 from our campus who represented the BSU working in a “summer missions” project in places like Mississippi, southeast Asia, China, Canada and in locales in Oklahoma.

FAVORITES

Color: Red (specifically crimson and cream)
Type of music: Jazz, big band era, contemporary Christian, classic 60s and 70s
Music artist: Michael Buble, Chicago, The Eagles, Gershwin
Food: Steak, Tex-Mex, Cajun (red beans and rice, shrimp)
Book: Until We Meet Again by Korenblit
Movies: Sgt. York; The Natural; The Rookie; 61; She Wore a Yellow Ribbon (John Ford movies with/without John Wayne)
TV Shows: Andy Griffith, CSI, M*A*S*H*

What does it mean “To Be a Ranger?”

A: The task for a ranger in the 1800s was to develop the land and the people who had a desire to live in this part of the world. There had to be a sense of enforcement while allowing the citizenry to develop their holdings based upon their talents and gifts. “Being a Ranger” at Northwestern carries similar responsibilities. As Rangers we are responsible to help students develop their talents and gifts in an orderly fashion to better affect people today and in the future. A Ranger is a leader. The world is a better place because of Rangers around the world.

Q: If you had a chance to tell a prospective student why they should choose Northwestern, what would you say? What would be your compelling short speech?
A: My earned degrees are not from Northwestern. But, Northwestern is home. I have former students who live and work throughout the world. I continually talk with former students who are proud of their university and proud of the education they received. It is my privilege to be a Ranger and to maintain consistent contact with the Ranger family.

Q: What is it about Northwestern that makes you want to teach the students here?
A: 1. Student-Faculty interaction is more than surface and classroom situations. Students can get to know faculty and administration and staff personally
2. The list is very long of successful alumni who have and continue to make a substantial difference in the lives of people all over the world. Northwestern’s impact is far more than regional.
3. Northwestern is more than academia – once a Ranger, always a Ranger. It is a sense of pride to wear red and black and sport the Ranger logo. Rangers take a backseat to no one.

Q: What makes Northwestern unique from any other university you may have taught at or even attended?
A: It seems that for most of the faculty and administration and staff, it is a given that students come first. We are here because of the students. Our task and goal is to educate those who desire to be educated and want to make a difference in the world – and definitely a difference is needed.