Northwestern to play host to entrepreneurship seminar

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Northwestern to play host to entrepreneurship seminar

Citizens of northwest Oklahoma will have an opportunity to participate in a two-day seminar titled, Entrepreneurs: Risk Takers and Innovators . . . the Stimulus of a Prosperous Society, on Feb. 18-19, at Northwestern Oklahoma State University-Enid. This seminar will focus on the importance of entrepreneurs and private enterprise in our society and will feature prominent scholars from around the country.

The program is free and open to the public. Advanced registration is requested.

The seminar will be held at Northwestern-Enid, 2929 E. Randolph, room 218, and sent to Alva, room IE 131, Woodward, room 145, and Ponca City, room B200-4, via Northwestern’s interactive television studio system. Sessions on Thursday, Feb. 18, will begin at 1:30 p.m., and on Friday, Feb. 19, at 8:30 a.m. The seminar will conclude Friday at 4 p.m.

Individuals who plan to partake in the entire seminar and are willing to complete class work following the seminar, may earn three upper division general business credit hours from Northwestern. Participants must pay tuition and enroll in the course to receive credit.

By interacting with experts in the field, participants will gain an understanding of how prosperity and social well-being can be improved by learning about the role of entrepreneurship in a free society. Speaking at the sessions will be Dr. Art Diamond, professor of economics at the University of Nebraska, Omaha; Dr. Emily Chamlee-Wright, professor of economics at Beloit College and Affiliated Senior Scholar with The Mercatus Center at George Mason University; Dr. Tony Woodlief, Vice-President for Academic Programs at the Market-Based Management Institute; and local entrepreneur, Mr. Lew Ward, founder and chairman of the board of Ward Petroleum.

Diamond will discuss the innovative entrepreneur as the agent of creative destruction. Chamlee-Wright will provide insight into the entrepreneur’s role during the recovery process from hurricane Katrina. Woodlief’s lectures will help attendees learn the practice of Principled Entrepreneurship™ and the Market-Based Management™ philosophy. Ward will share information about how his company was formed and decisions that were made developing it into one of the top 100 fastest growing American companies, as recently designated by Inc. magazine.

Another objective of the seminar is to inspire attendees to pursue entrepreneurial dreams in private enterprise. In addition to the scholar lectures, information will be shared about resources available locally to assist individuals desiring to investigate entrepreneurial opportunities in the region.

Participants will include Jon Blankenship, president & CEO of the Greater Enid Chamber of Commerce; Bill Gregory, regional director of the Oklahoma Small Business Development Center; Brent Kisling, executive director Enid Regional Development Alliance; and Brian Gaddy, director of the James W. Strate Center for Business Development at Autry Technology Center.

This learning experience is made possible by a grant from the Charles G. Koch Charitable Foundation and the Cherokee Strip Regional Heritage Center.

Contact Dr. Cheryl Evans, Northwestern-Enid dean, at clevans@nwosu.edu or 580-213-3105 to reserve a space for the seminar. To complete the registration process, participants must indicate which site to attend and choose seminar sessions.

-NW-

Thursday, February 18, 2010 – DAY ONE

1:00 – 1:30 Dr. Cheryl Evans - Welcome, Intros & Syllabus
1:30 – 3:00 Dr. Tony Woodlief - Principled Entrepreneurship
3:00 – 3:15 Break
3:15 – 4:15 Lew Ward, Chairman and Founder of Ward Petroleum - Local Entrepreneur
http://www.wardpetroleum.com/history_ward_petroleum.html
4:15 – 5:30 Resources for Local Entrepreneurs – Jon Blankenship, President & CEO
Greater Enid Chamber of Commerce; Bill Gregory, Regional Director of the Oklahoma Small Business Development Center;
5:30 – 7:00 Dinner Break on your own
7:00 – 8:30 Dr. Art Diamond - "The Innovative Entrepreneur as the Agent of Creative Destruction"

Friday, February 19, 2010 – DAY TWO

8:30 – 10:00 Dr. Emily Chamlee-Wright - “Entrepreneurship and the Rules of the Game”
10:00 – 10:15 Break
10:15 – 11:45 Dr. Art Diamond - "What it Takes to Be an Innovative Entrepreneur: Motives, Education and More"
11:45 - 12:00 Break
12:00 – 1:30 Dr. Emily Chamlee-Wright - Luncheon - “Entrepreneurial Response in the Wake of Hurricane Katrina”
1:30 – 1:45 Break
1:45 – 2:45 Resources for Local Entrepreneurs – Brent Kisling, executive director Enid Regional Development Alliance
Brian Gaddy, director of the James W. Strate Center for Business Development at Autry Technology Center.
2:45 – 4:00 Dr. Tony Woodlief - Applying Market-Based Management
4:00 Dr. Cheryl Evans - Class Dismissed

Scholars Biographical Information:

Arthur M. Diamond, Jr., earned his graduate degrees in philosophy and in economics from the University of Chicago, and is currently writing a book advocating Openness to Creative Destruction. He is a professor of economics at the University of Nebraska, Omaha, where he has been a recipient of the Award for Distinguished Research or Creative Activity. His past research has focused mainly on labor economics, the history of economic thought and on the economics of science and technology; and has appeared in journals such as Science, Economic Inquiry, History of Political Economy, The Journal of Human Resources, Research Policy, and Economics of Innovation and New Technology. Diamond has been awarded grants from the National Science Foundation for his research on the economics of science, and from the Charles G. Koch Foundation for the development of a seminar course on the Economics of Entrepreneurship. Recently he was invited to present a paper on "The Epistemology of Entrepreneurship" to the 2010 Wirth Conference in Vancouver. His nonacademic writings include the script for “Frank Knight and the Chicago School,” and postings on artdiamondblog.com.

Emily Chamlee-Wright is the Elbert H. Neese Professor of Economics at Beloit College and Affiliated Senior Scholar with The Mercatus Center at George Mason University. She earned her doctorate in economics from George Mason University in 1993. Her research investigates the confluence of cultural and economic processes. She is the author of three books, The Cultural Foundations of Economic Development (Routledge 1997), Culture and Enterprise: The Development, Representation, and Morality of Business, with Don Lavoie (Routledge 2000), and The Cultural and Political Economy of Recovery: Social Learning in a Post-Disaster Environment (Routlege, forthcoming) which examines how communities deploy socially embedded resources toward rebound and recovery in the wake of disaster. Along with Virgil Storr, Chamlee-Wright is editor of a collected volume The Political Economy of Hurricane Katrina and Community Rebound (Edward Elgar, forthcoming). Chamlee-Wright’s research appears in venues such as The Journal of Urban Affairs, Public Choice, Rationality & Society, The Review of Austrian Economics, The Review of Political Economy, and The Journal of Economic Development and Cultural Change. Professor Chamlee-Wright is a former W.K. Kellogg National Leadership Fellow and a recipient of the Underkoffler Award for Excellence in Teaching from Beloit College.

Dr. Tony Woodlief is Vice-President for Academic Programs at the Market-Based Management Institute, which is focused on advancing the understanding and practice of Market-Based Management® among nonprofits, universities, and other community organizations. Previously, Tony was president of The Mercatus Center at George Mason University, a center for economic research, education, and outreach. Before joining Mercatus, Tony was vice president for education projects at the Charles G. Koch Charitable Foundation, where he worked with university research centers specializing in economics, entrepreneurship, and social change. Prior to joining the foundation, Tony was a consultant and facilitator with the Market-Based Management team of Koch Industries, Inc. where he provided training to employees and worked with businesses to improve performance. Tony has a Ph.D. in political science from the University of Michigan, and his writing has appeared in The Wall Street Journal, National Review, The London Times, and WORLD Magazine.

About the Charles G. Koch Charitable Foundation
The Charles G. Koch Charitable Foundation was established in 1980 by Charles G. Koch, chairman of the board and CEO of Koch Industries, Inc. The mission of the foundation is to advance social progress and well-being through the development, application and dissemination of the Science of Liberty™. The foundation primarily supports research and education programs that analyze the impact of free societies, in particular how they advance the well-being of mankind. The foundation is a non-profit organization exempt from federal income tax as an Internal Revenue Code Section 501(c) (3) organization.

About the Cherokee Strip Regional Heritage Center
The mission of the Oklahoma Historical Society’s Cherokee Strip Regional Heritage Center is to tell the extraordinary stories of settling the Cherokee Strip and share the inspiring lessons of leadership with future generations. After the successful $8 million fundraising initiative, “Claiming Our Past, Inspiring Our Future: The Campaign to Create the Cherokee Strip Regional Heritage Center,” the museum plans to reopen in September 2010. The Heritage Center will showcase the many lessons of leadership evident in development of the region, and inspire future generations in ambition, dedication, courage, wisdom, and perseverance.